Course Descriptions and Course Learning Outcomes

A) Biology Courses

Biol130: Cell and Molecular Biology (3/2/4)
This course introduces basic principles of cellular and molecular biology. Topics include: properties of life, organic molecules, general features of cells, membrane structure, synthesis and transport, introduction to energy, enzymes and metabolism, cell respiration, photosynthesis, cell communication, extra cellular matrices, cell junctions, tissues, nucleic acid structure, DNA replication and chromosome structure, gene expression and regulation, mutation, the eukaryotic cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis, viruses and bacteria.

Course Learning Outcomes:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the chemical components of the macromolecules of life and their functions
  • Describe the structural differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells or between plant and animal cells
  • Classify living organisms within taxonomic groups
  • Explain the differences and similarities between photosynthesis and cellular respiration
  • Predict the outcome of a reaction catalyzed by enzymes under different conditions
  • Apply the concepts of replication, transcription and translation
  • Distinguish between meiosis and mitosis
  • Predict the genotype and phenotype of simple crosses of relevance to human genetics and disease
  • Use a compound microscope and other bioinstrumentation required in cellular or molecular biology investigations.
  • Write, discuss or critique about emerging biology-related topics individually or in groups (i.e. cancer, epigenetics, stem cell research, nanobiology, new bioinstrumentation, visit to museums…)

Biol280: Anatomy and Physiology I (3/2/4)
This course is the first part of a 2-semester series that covers the basic structure and function of the human body as an integrated set of systems. Topics include: Functional compartments of the cells and body, tissues, mechanisms of communication, integration and homeostasis, an overview of the endocrine, nervous and sensory systems and the integrative control and mechanics of body movement. Requirement: Biol130

Course Learning Outcomes:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Relate the structure and function of the endocrine, nervous and musculoskeletal systems in humans
  • Make measurements on and interpret data of physiological processes in living systems.
  • Explain mechanisms of communication, integration and homeostasis involved in body movement.
  • Discuss or write about clinical case studies or recent research related to the lectures or labs of the course.

Biol290: Anatomy and Physiology II (3/2/4)
This course is the second part of a 2-semester series that covers the basic structure and function of the human body as an integrated set of systems. Topics include: an overview of the cardiovascular, circulatory, respiratory, excretory and digestive systems and energy balance. Requirements: Biol130, Biol280

Course Learning Outcomes:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Relate the structure and function of the cardiovascular, circulatory, respiratory, excretory and digestive systems in humans
  • Make measurements on and interpret data of physiological processes in living systems.
  • Explain mechanisms of communication, integration and homeostasis involved in blood pressure control, breathing, urine concentration and energy balance.
  • Discuss or write about clinical case studies or recent research related to the lectures or labs of the course.

B) Chemistry Courses

CHEM120: Chemistry of the Built Environment (3/2/4)
This course serves as the introductory chemistry course for students in the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environment. The course provides a fundamental introduction to chemistry topics with a focus on the built environment. Fundamental principles of chemistry with emphasis on solving problems encountered in business and commerce. Topics include: the atomic model; writing, balancing; and predicting reactions; stoichiometry; the periodic table; properties of acids, bases, and salts; properties of aqueous solutions. Corequisite: MATH205 College Mathematics I.

Course Learning Outcomes:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Use fundamental chemical principles to make predictions about reactivity and general properties of materials of the built environment.
  • Apply fundamental chemical principles in laboratory experiments keeping safety in mind
  • Collect, represent and interpret experimental results accurately and concisely using technical narrative, graphs, and tables. 
  • Discuss, write or explain fundamental chemistry concepts with direct application to the built environment.

Chem360: Chemistry I (3/2/4)
This is a course designed to relate the fundamental principles of chemistry with practical problems encountered in industry. Emphasis will be placed on problem-solving. Topics include: the atomic model and theory, chemical bonding, balancing chemical reactions, simple and complex stoichiometry, equilibrium, acids-bases reactions, properties of solutions, combustion, oxidation and reduction, and electrochemistry. Laboratory will correlate with lecture material. Prereq: MATH 250 Pre-calculus, MATH 235 College Mathematics C.

Course Learning Outcomes:
At the completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Describe and interpret statements and questions concerning the forms and states of matter, the structure of the atom, arrangement of electrons, and how this relates to the organization of the periodic table.
  • Analyze and describe/interpret statements and questions related to chemical bonding and structure and the related properties of materials using atomic theory.
  • Differentiate between the essential features and properties of covalent, ionic and metallic bonding.
  • Analyze chemical reactions according to stoichiometric methodology and be able to predict the outcome of reactions, including those involving acids and bases and their applications
  • Examine the four major reaction types, including combustion reactions and evaluate their industrial and environmental impact
  • Demonstrate knowledge of redox concepts and reactions using appropriate terminology and examples of redox reactions with industrial applications and implications such as the various types of corrosion and their economic and environmental impact and prevention methods.
  • Formulate meaningful conclusions according to scientific inquiry by collecting, analyzing, summarizing and interpreting laboratory data.

Chem362: Materials: Bonding & Reactions (2/0/2, online)
This course introduces topics of our existing course Engineering Chemistry, CHEM380, that are not extensively covered in a typical general chemistry course. These topics include electron and molecular orbital diagrams, prediction of reaction behavior and equilibrium, limiting reagents, VSEPR theory, properties of modern materials and metals, and crystal systems in solids. This course will allow students who have passed a four-credit general chemistry course to receive credit for CHEM380. Prerequisite: a four-credit general chemistry course with lab.

Course Learning Outcomes:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Solve stoichiometry problems with limiting reagents
  • Calculate equilibrium constants and predict reaction behavior based on Le Chatelier’s Principle
  • Construct electron orbital diagrams
  • Predict ionic charges and ion sizes based on their location on the periodic table
  • Differentiate between ionic and covalent interactions
  • Construct molecular orbital diagrams for simple molecules
  • Predict the shapes of small molecules based on VSEPR theory
  • Recognize different types of modern materials and recall their basic properties
  • Be able to list and describe the crystal systems in solids
  • Explain the behavior of metals based on understanding of their electronic structure (ie magnetism, conductivity, band theory)

Chem380: Engineering Chemistry (3/2/4)
Introductory chemistry for engineers, covering atomic structure, molecular orbitals and bonding, stoichiometry, intermolecular forces, equilibria, acid-base chemistry, reduction/oxidation, electrochemistry, metals, and modern materials. This course provides and introduction to chemistry for engineers focusing on engineering needs in understanding the structure of matter.  Understanding of electronic structure, molecular structure, and its effects on bulk structure will be investigated.  Laboratory exercises supporting the understanding of the lecture topics will be included, with a focus on good laboratory practice.

Course Learning Outcomes:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the behavior of matter and materials using fundamental knowledge of their nature (ie electrons and intermolecular forces).
  • Predict potential complications from combining various chemicals or metals in an engineering setting.
  • Solve chemistry problems typically found on the Fundamentals of Engineering exam.
  • Keep notebooks of laboratory experiments and be able to evaluate results based on their own notes.

C) Physics Courses

Phys210: College Physics I (3/2/4)
General introduction to mechanics. Topics include kinematics, vectors, Newton's Laws, equilibrium, work and energy, momentum, and circular motion. Prerequisite: MATH205 College Mathematics I.

Course Learning Outcomes:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Convert units by using conversion factors and unit analysis
  • Distinguish between vector and scalar quantities
  • Use vectors to describe physical observations.
  • Use the equations of motion with constant acceleration in one dimension
  • Use the equations of motion for projectile motion in two dimensions
  • State Newton’s laws of motion and the law of universal gravitation
  • Resolve vector diagrams on static and dynamical systems.
  • Define the scientific meaning of Work, energy and power
  • Use the equations of uniform circular motion
  • Define and use the concepts of linear impulse and momentum
  • Use the equations of angular motion with constant angular acceleration.

Phys211: Conceptual Physics (3/2/4)
A survey of physics and its applications to modern life. Mechanics, sound, heat, electricity, light, and structure of matter are examined. Understanding of concepts, rather than detailed calculations, is emphasized through lecture and laboratory.

Course Learning Outcomes:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the behavior of and make predictions regarding the phenomena of the physical world.
  • Apply fundamental principles of physics to solve problems relating to mechanics, energy, matter, and waves.
  • Understand the importance of record-keeping and have practiced its use during labs and/or lectures.
  • Be able to work independently or as part of a group to discuss or write about fundamental concepts and applications in physics.

Phys220: College Physics II (3/2/4)
Physical properties of solids and fluids, heat, sound, light, electric, and magnetic forces. Prerequisites: MATH250 Precalculus and PHYS210 College Physics I.

Course Learning Outcomes:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the difference between tensile stress and shear stress.
  • Find the modulus of elasticity of a material.
  • Find the density of an object and use it to identify the substance.
  • Explain buoyancy for an object suspended in a liquid.
  • Describe qualitative aspects of fluid flow using Bernoulli’s Principle.
  • Describe fluid flow quantitatively using the equation of continuity and Bernoulli’s equation.
  • Predict the behavior of materials when heated.
  • Predict the period of oscillations for a mass on a spring.
  • Describe the connections among displacement, velocity, and acceleration for an oscillatory system.
  • Explain phenomena involving electrical and magnetic forces.

Phys292: Advanced Problems in Physics (3/0/3; Online)
This course introduces the lecture topics and calculus-based problem sessions of our Engineering Physics I course, PHYS310. It is intended for students that have passed a four-credit algebra-based college physics course with lab, and have either taken or are currently enrolled in Calculus I, MATH280. This course and a four-credit algebra-based college physics course with lab is the equivalent of Engineering Physics I, PHYS310. Prerequisite: PHYS210. Corequisite: MATH280.

Course Learning Outcomes:
At the completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Apply dimensional analysis and convert units of physical quantities.
  • Use vectors to describe physical observations.
  • Perform and demonstrate detailed problem solving expertise.
  • Identify the meaning of space and time, and apply these abstractions to the physical world.
  • Use calculus to derive formulas for kinematics.
  • Investigate the nature of space and time to develop calculus definitions of velocities and accelerations.
  • Able to determine the motion of massive bodies in three dimensions.
  • Apply Newtons Laws of motion, and be able to resolve vector diagrams on static and dynamical systems.
  • Describe the physics of circular motion in a plane.
  • Define the scientific meaning of ”‘Energy”’,”’Work”’, and ”‘Power”’.
  • Differentiate between scalar and vector mathematics.
  • Describe Newtons laws via momentum.
  • Describe Momentum via calculus.
  • Define Mass, and contemplate its origin.
  • Apply Newtons laws to gravity, and use this information to describe orbital motion.
  • Resolve the motion of satellites
  • Describe Keplers Laws of planetary motion.

Phys310: Engineering Physics I (3/2/4)
A calculus-based course emphasizing the principles and applications of mechanics. Topics include: Newton's Laws, equilibrium; work, energy, power; momentum, circular motion. Prerequisite: MATH265 Engineering Mathematics or MATH235 College Mathematics C. Corequisite: MATH280 Calculus I.

Course Learning Outcomes:
At the completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Apply dimensional analysis and convert units of physical quantities.
  • Use vectors to describe physical observations.
  • Perform and demonstrate detailed problem solving expertise.
  • Identify the meaning of space and time, and apply these abstractions to the physical world.
  • Use calculus to derive formulas for kinematics.
  • Investigate the nature of space and time to develop calculus definitions of velocities and accelerations.
  • Able to determine the motion of massive bodies in three dimensions.
  • Apply Newtons Laws of motion, and be able to resolve vector diagrams on static and dynamical systems.
  • Describe the physics of circular motion in a plane.
  • Define the scientific meaning of ”‘Energy”’,”’Work”’, and ”‘Power”’.
  • Differentiate between scalar and vector mathematics.
  • Describe Newtons laws via momentum.
  • Describe Momentum via calculus.
  • Define Mass, and contemplate its origin.
  • Apply Newtons laws to gravity, and use this information to describe orbital motion.
  • Resolve the motion of satellites
  • Describe Keplers Laws of planetary motion.

Phys320: Engineering Physics II (3/2/4)
Topics include: physical properties of solids and fluids, atomic structure, heat, sound, wave motion, electricity and magnetism. Prerequisites: PHYS310 Engineering Physics I and MATH280 Calculus I. Corequisite: MATH290 Calculus II.

Course Learning Outcomes:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Apply fundamentals of density, pressure, Pascal’s Principle, buoyancy and Archimedes’ Principle;
  • Apply the fundamental parameters of simple harmonic motion
  • Apply the fundamental parameters of wave phenomena
  • Describe interference and refraction phenomena
  • Analyze electric fields and forces for simple arrangements of static charges using Gauss’s Law and Coulomb’s Law;
  • Analyze magnetic fields for simple arrangements of currents using Ampere’s Law;
  • Analyze electric fields and magnetic fields for simple arrangements of changing electric and magnetic fields Faraday’s Law and Ampere’s Law;
  • Apply Maxwell’s Equations in differential and integral form;
  • Discuss the relationship of Maxwell’s Equations to the phenomenon of light and electromagnetic radiation. 

Phys411: Modern Physics (3/2/4, Hybrid):
This course takes a student on a journey of the physics after 1905. Emphasis is placed on the shortcoming of classical physics at the turn of the century leading to the discoveries of the modern era. The special theory of relativity, and the foundations of quantum mechanics serve as the cornerstone for the course. Extensions of these topics will include the modern view of the atom, nuclear physics, wave particle duality of light and mass, space time structure and gps implementation of relativity. Prerequisites: MATH280 (or MATH285) and PHYS310.

Course Learning Outcomes:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Define the shortcoming of classical physics and describe the need for modifications to classical theory.
  • Describe the Special Theory of Relativity
  • Solve problems using time dilation and space contraction
  • Describe the wave particle duality of light
  • Investigate the nature and structure of the atom to develop the four forces of nature
  • Define a de Broglie or matter wave
  • Apply the laws of wave mechanics to develop the Schrodinger equation
  • Develop the mathematics required to solve a one dimensional Schrodinger equation system
  • Define and demonstrate real world examples of quantum tunneling
  • Describe the Bohr-Rutherford Gold Foil experiment
  • Describe and quantify nuclear decay
  • Distinguish the difference between classical entropy and quantum entropy
  • Describe the structure of the nucleus of an atom
  • Describe the general theory of relativity and its description of a black hole
  • Evaluate how General and Special Relativity combine to form a theory on cosmology
  • Describe the four fundamental forces of nature and their relation to one another via the standard model

D) Special Topics-Physics, Chemistry or Biology

Phys406, Chem406 or Biol406:
These courses investigate topics of special interest to faculty and students that are outside regular course offerings.  Some of them may be offered as science electives.


Phys406: Introduction to Astronomy (Hybrid/Project-Based, 3/2/4):
This course will be taught using a project-based approach. The project? Design, build, fly and recover a nanosatellite version of the Hubble Space Telescope.

Course Outcomes:
Students will explore and define the characteristics needed for a small satellite to obtain astrophotographs of scientific value. Considerations include size, weight, target identification and acquisition, power systems, communications, command and telemetry, cost estimation, project management, and fabrication, among many others. An important design goal is to design a nanosatellite that can be returned safely to Earth and displayed in the Alumni Library. It is expected that completion of the project will take multiple semesters and groups of students. This project will not be a paper study only. The long-term goal is to design, build, launch and recover the Leopard Space Telescope, Mark I 


 
 

 

© Wentworth Institute of Technology   |   550 Huntington Avenue   |   Boston, MA 02115   |   617-989-4590