Accreditation

The Department of Construction Management at Wentworth Institute of Technology is an American Council for Construction Education accredited school since 2000. Construction Management has been an integral academic element of Wentworth since its founding in 1911.

The Department  of Construction Management is a cohesive group of experienced faculty and staff working together to provide students a nationally recognized and accredited construction management education.


Academic Quality Improvement Plan

The Quality Improvement Plan (QIP) will be the basis for continuous improvement of the four-year Bachelor of Science in Construction Management (BSCM) at Wentworth Institute of Technology (hereafter “Wentworth” or “the Institute”).  The QIP has three major components:

  • a Strategic Plan for the Construction Management Department
  • an Assessment Plan
  • the Assessment Implementation Plan
  1. Strategic Plan

The Construction Management (CM) Department strives for continuous improvement in order to remain relevant as a provider of education in the continuously evolving construction industry.

The CM Department uses various constituencies (i.e. current students, alumni, faculty, administrators, employers, industrial advisors, and accreditors) in a structured assessment procedure that uses quantitative and qualitative data gathered from a variety of sources on a regular basis to affect change and improvement in the program as needed.  Implementation is spearheaded by the Department Chair in concert with CM faculty.  It should be noted that any action taken as a result of assessment to modify the curriculum begins at the CM program level with recommendations being made to the Department Chair by the CM faculty. Before implementation, these recommendations must be approved by the Institute Curriculum Committee and ultimately by the Vice President for Academic Affairs/Provost.

Data are collected from the various constituencies for assessment purposes.  These data are evaluated regularly in relation to the course and department goals and learning objectives.  Outcome assessment results are correlated with mission, goals, program content, and outcomes to implement change where needed.  Changes, if required, are proposed, discussed, and voted upon by the CM faculty.  It should be noted that assessment data from all sources, as well as proposed changes to the curriculum, are shared and discussed with the Industry Advisory Board (IAB) at the bi-annual meetings. 

The following is provided to establish the adequacy of resources available to the department:

Ten full-time faculty members are in the Construction Management department.  The table below summarizes information about faculty:

Name

Rank

FTE

Degree/Certification

Years on Staff

Bhatti,   Ilyas

Associate

1.0

M.S. / PE

6

Bakhshi,   Payam

Assistant

1.0

Ph.D.

4

Cosma,   Cristina

Associate

1.0

Ph.D. / PE

10

Hasso,   Mark

Full

1.0

Ph.D. / PE

28

Johnson,   Todd

Assistant

1.0

M.S. / CPC

6

Kearney,   William

Assistant

1.0

M.S. / CCM

3

Simon,   Erik

Assistant

1.0

Ph.D. / CPC

3

Snow,   Monica

Associate

1.0

Ph.D. / PE

8

Sumner,   Scott

Associate

1.0

M.S. / CCM

11

Taddeo,   Thomas

Associate

1.0

M.S.

37

All day students and faculty members receive laptops through Wentworth.  Therefore, almost any classroom can become a computer lab.  The students have access to software such as Primavera Project Management (P6), MS Office, On-Screen Takeoff, MS Project, and Revit.

The Department maintains five separate laboratory facilities that are utilized for instruction in the program.  The table below describes each laboratory, its size, major pieces of equipment, and the courses that utilize the particular laboratory.  All laboratories are clean, properly lit and ventilated, secure and well maintained.

Building

Room

Area (ft2)

Name

Equipment

Courses

Annex   North

005

310

Survey   Locker

-Total   stations

-Automatic   levels

-Pipe   laser

-Digital   theodolite

-Global   positioning system

-Construction   Surveying

Annex   Central

007

1,249

Aggregate   Testing Lab

-Compression   machine

-Sieve   shaker with assorted sieves

-Drying   ovens

-Scales

-Compaction   equipment

-Materials   Testing and Quality Control

Annex   Central

012

3,604

Concrete   Lab

-Concrete   mixers

-Curing   tank

-Scales

-Materials   Testing

-Building   Construction

-Heavy   Construction

Annex   Central

N/A

3,951

Jobsite   Lab

-Jobsite   trailer

-Concrete   forms

-Masonry   mixer

-Static   displays

-Building   Construction

Annex   South

002

004

3,861

CM   Project Lab

-Workstations   with 22” monitors

-Laser   printer

-Construction   Estimating

-Advanced   Estimating

-Senior   Project

-Construction   Graphics

II.    Assessment Plan

The Assessment Plan includes the following:

·         Mission Statement

·         Goals and Objectives

·         Learning Outcomes

·         Performance Criteria

·         Evaluation Methodology

A.    Mission Statement

Institute Mission

Wentworth's core purpose and mission is to empower, inspire and innovate through experiential learning.  Do.  Learn.  Succeed.

Institute Vision

Wentworth’s vision for the future is to become nationally recognized as the university of choice for externally-collaborative, project-based, interdisciplinary learning.

Institute Core Values

At Wentworth, our core values reflect that we are student-centered, that we are passionate for real-life, hands-on teaching and learning, and that innovation and creativity are at the center of what we do. We express these three core values as Students first – The world is our classroom –Thinking without a box.

Program Mission

The mission of the Construction Management program is to provide the student with both the education and work experience to enter the construction profession as a productive team member with the potential to become an innovative technical problem-solver and industry leader. The philosophy of the program is to offer a curriculum which emphasizes instruction that challenges, shapes and encourages students to think about and apply their expanding technical knowledge and organizational skills to the solution of contemporary problems. This philosophy is supported by the educational mission of the Institute that emphasizes physics and mathematics, both theoretical and applied, the humanities and social sciences, communication skills, and computer science. Students are prepared through their educational experience to adapt to changes in society, technology and the profession.

B.     Goals/Objectives

Institute Goals

In order to fulfill its mission, Wentworth has established the following Student Learning Goals expected of every graduate. These Learning Goals are reinforced in the classroom, laboratory and studio, and in cooperative education experiences and co-curricular opportunities. To this end we expect that all graduates of Wentworth be able to:

  • Locate information and evaluate it critically for its appropriateness and validity
  • Communicate effectively in written, spoken and visual formats
  • Acquire and use analytical tools and skills for evaluating information and solving problems
  • Identify the traits of good leadership
  • Acquire and use the skills needed for effective teamwork
  • Recognize and apply concepts of ethical behavior to personal and public issues
  • Explain the sustainable use of human, physical, and economic resources
  • Recognize and identify historical and contemporary societal and global issues

 

Program Goals

To accomplish the mission of the Construction Management program, the following goals have been developed for the Department in order to prepare students academically for personal and professional success in the built environment:

  • Deliver a construction management education program that is nationally accredited and continuously assessed and improved
  • Regularly meet with and advise students on their status related to the curriculum to ensure they understand the requirements for degree completion.
  • Provide courses which develop the analytical tools and technical knowledge to evaluate information and solve problems as supervisors and managers in the construction industry
  • Provide courses which develop skills to lead and serve as members of interdisciplinary teams, as well as communicate in written, oral, and visual formats
  • Instill the professional ethical responsibilities of leaders and managers in the construction industry

C.     Learning Outcomes

The following learning outcomes are based on the ACCE recommendations and are the basis for the academic curriculum:

  1. Create written communications appropriate to the construction discipline.
  2. Create oral presentations appropriate to the construction discipline.
  3. Create a construction project safety plan.
  4. Create construction project estimates
  5. Create construction project schedules.
  6. Analyze professional decisions based upon ethical principles.
  7. Analyze construction documents for planning and management of construction processes.
  8. Analyze methods, materials, and equipment used on construction projects.
  9. Apply construction management skills as an effective member of a multi-disciplinary team.
  10. Apply electronic-based technology to manage the construction process.
  11. Apply basic surveying techniques for construction layout and control.
  12. Analyze different methods of project delivery and the roles and responsibilities of all constituencies involved in the design and construction process.
  13. Explain construction risk management.
  14. Explain construction accounting and cost control.
  15. Explain construction quality assurance and control.
  16. Explain construction project control processes.
  17. Explain the legal implications of contract, common, and regulatory law to manage a construction project.
  18. Explain the basic principles of sustainable construction.
  19. Demonstrate the basic principles of structural behavior.
  20. Demonstrate the basic principles of mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems.

The chart on the next page lists each of the Learning Outcomes and indicates in which specific CM course(s) the Learning Outcomes are included and evaluated.


ACCE   LEARNING OBJECTIVES BY CM COURSE

 

ACCE Learning Objectives

CONM 1000 Intro to CM

CONM 1500 Construction Graphics

CONM 1200 Building Construction

CONM 2500 Building Systems

CONM 2000 Construction Surveying

CONM 1600 Heavy Construction   Equip.

CONM 2100 Statics + Strength of   Matl.

CONM 2200 Estimating

CONM 3000 Material Testing and   QC

CONM 2600 Wood and Steel

CONM 3200 Const. Project Scheduling

CONM 3100 Const. Project   Management

CONM 3500 Advanced Estimating

CONM 3600 Concrete Analysis +   Design

CONM 4000 Construction Proj.   Controls

CONM 4100 Const. Bus. + Finance

CONM 4200 Construction Safety

CONM 5500 CM Senior Project

CONM 4600 Construction Law

Comprehensive Final Examination

1. Create Written communications appropriate to the   construction discipline.

X

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

X

X

X

X

X

 

2. Create oral presentations appropriate to the   construction discipline.

X

 

X

X

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

X

X

 

X

 

 

3. Create a construction project safety plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

X

4. Create construction project costs estimates.

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

5. Create construction project schedules.

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

X

6. Analyze professional decisions based upon ethical   principles.

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

 

X

X

X

 

X

X

 

X

X

X

7. Analyze construction documents for planning and   management of construction processes.

 

X

 

X

 

 

 

X

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

 

X

 

X

8. Analyze methods, materials, and equipment used on   construction projects.

 

 

X

X

 

X

 

 

X

X

X

X

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

X

9. Apply construction management skills as an effective   member of a multi-disciplinary team.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

 

10. Apply electronic-based technology to manage the   construction process.

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

X

X

X

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

11. Apply basic surveying techniques for construction   layout and control.

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

12. Analyze methods of project delivery and the roles and   responsibilities of all constituencies involved in the design and   construction process.

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

13. Explain construction risk management.

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

X

X

 

X

14. Explain construction accounting and cost control.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

X

 

 

 

X

15. Explain construction quality assurance and control.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

16. Explain construction project control processes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

X

 

X

17. Explain the legal implications of contract, common,   and regulatory law to manage a construction project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

X

X

X

18. Explain the basic principles of sustainable   construction.

X

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

19. Demonstrate the basic principles of structural   behavior.

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

X

20. Demonstrate the basic principles of mechanical,   electrical, and plumbing systems.

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X


D.    Performance Criteria

Indirect

  • Pre- and Post-Course Surveys
  • Student and Employer Co-op Surveys
  • Senior Exit Interview and Survey
  • Graduate Survey

Direct

  • Comprehensive Final Exam
  • Senior Project Industry Panel Evaluation

E.     Evaluation Methodology

The following are the assessment tools used by the CM department to evaluate the program.  Results of the tools are analyzed, and all areas of “Concern” or “Weakness” are reviewed by the CM Department.  Specific areas of “Concern” or “Weakness” that appear in multiple assessment tools or over multiple assessment periods are scrutinized and may be the impetus for revisions to a specific course or courses and/or to the curriculum. 

 

Pre- and Post-Course Surveys

Pre- and Post-Course Surveys are conducted for each course.  Questions are derived from the specific course learning objectives.  Each Pre- and Post-Course survey for a given course asks identical questions in order to compare student perceptions of their skills and knowledge at the beginning and end of each course. 

The assessment goal is for at least 70% of the students to “Strongly Agree” or “Agree” that they are able to meet each learning objectives at the end of the course.  If less than 70% of the students respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Concern”.  If less than 60% of the students respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Weakness”.

 

Student and Employer Co-op Surveys

Students evaluate their co-op experience via two surveys, one completed at mid-semester and the other at the end of the semester during each of the two required co-op semesters.  The Co-op Office conducts these surveys and subsequently summarizes the data.  The mid-semester survey is used by the co-op office to monitor the co-op experience of each student and to take quick action as problems arise.  The results of the end of semester survey are made available to the department during the next semester at the latest.

The co-op evaluation includes a component called the Employer evaluation of Co-op Student’s Performance which is done at semester’s end by each employer with respect to the individual student employed.  Once again, the Co-op office conducts the survey, summarizes the data and makes it available to the department usually in the following semester.

The summary results of both the end of semester student and co-op employer surveys are shared with the CM faculty.  They provide valuable, detailed feedback from students and industry in four major categories, each with several subcategories:

·         Technical Knowledge Skills

·         Managing Self & Tasks

·         Communicating

·         Creativity and Change

The assessment goal is for at least 70% of the student and employers to respond in the top two categories for each question.  If less than 70% of the students and employers respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Concern”.  If less than 60% of the students and employers respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Weakness”.

 

Senior Exit Interview and Survey

The Department Chair meets in the summer semester prior to graduation with all senior CM students.  The students also complete an anonymous on-line exit survey.  The interview and survey allow the students to express their approval, criticisms, and/or thoughts concerning courses and curriculum and are used to evaluate the CM program on an annual basis.  Results are shared and discussed with faculty during the fall semester.  Changes to courses and curriculum are influenced by the information gathered.

The assessment goal is for at least 70% of the student to respond in the top two categories for each question.  If less than 70% of the students respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Concern”.  If less than 60% of the students respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Weakness”.

Alumni Survey

Wentworth alumni are surveyed every six years.  Data is collected and summarized by the Alumni Office and reviewed by CM faculty.

The assessment goal is for at least 70% of the alumni to respond in the top two categories for each question.  If less than 70% of the alumni respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Concern”.  If less than 60% of the alumni respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Weakness”.

Comprehensive Final Examination

The Comprehensive Final Examination is given as the final exam in the CM Senior Project course, which is taken in the final semester.  The exam contains questions from all CM courses in the curriculum.  The grade on the exam is a portion of the final grade for the course.  

The assessment goal is for at least 70% of the students to correctly answer each questions on the exam.  If less than 70% of the students answer a question correctly, it is considered an area of “Concern”.  If less than 60% of the students answer a question correctly, it is considered an area of “Weakness”.

 

Senior Project Industry Panel Evaluation

During Senior Project, members of the construction industry act as panelists for the final oral presentation.  After the presentations, the panelists are asked to evaluate the overall knowledge and skills of the CM students and their readiness to enter in the construction industry.

The assessment goal is for at least 70% of the industry members to “Strongly Agree” or “Agree” that students are able to meet each of the applicable learning objectives.  If less than 70% of the industry members respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Concern”.  If less than 60% of the industry members respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Weakness”.

III. Assessment Implementation Plan

The table below summarizes the assessment schedule:

Assessment   Tool

Frequency

Conducted   By

Pre- and Post-Course Surveys

Every semester

CM Department

Student and Employer Co-op Surveys

Every co-op semester

Co-op Office

Senior Exit Interview and Survey

Annually

CM Department

Graduate Survey

Annually

Career Services Office

Alumni Survey

Every six (6) years

Alumni Office

Comprehensive Final Examination

Annually

CM Department

Senior Project Industry Panel Evaluation

Annually

CM Department

Results of the assessments are collected and areas of “Concern” or “Weakness” are identified.  Based upon the CM Department review, any needed revisions to courses and/or the curriculum are proposed, implemented and tracked.  This information is published in the Annual Assessment Report.

Below is the latest ACCE accreditation information and schedule:

ACCE Accreditation

Last   ACCE Accreditation Visit

2013

Next   ACCE Accreditation Visit

2019

Assessment Report

 

Department of Construction Management

College of Architecture, Design and Construction Management

Wentworth Institute of Technology

 

                       

 

 

Annual Assessment Report

Assessment of Student Learning for the Undergraduate Construction Management Department

 

Academic Year 2014-2015

 

Published October 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Construction Management program is accredited by the American Council of Construction

 Education (ACCE).  This report fulfills the ACCE information requirement, Document 103, Section VIII-

Relations with the General Public.

 

This Assessment Report covers the period from September 2014 – August 2015.  It is an annual summary of the results of the assessment tools identified in the CM Quality Improvement Plan (QIP).

The Quality Improvement Plan (QIP) is the basis for continuous improvement of the four-year Bachelor of Science in Construction Management (BSCM) at Wentworth Institute of Technology.  The report resulting from the assessments are provided to the Department Chair, faculty, College of Architecture, Design and Construction Management Dean and members of the CM Industry Advisory Board.

  1. Assessment Plan

The Assessment Plan includes the following:

  • Mission Statement

  • Goals and Objectives

  • Learning Outcomes

  • Performance Criteria

  • Evaluation Methodology

A.    Mission Statement

Institute Mission

Wentworth's core purpose and mission is to empower, inspire and innovate through experiential learning.  Do.  Learn.  Succeed.

Institute Vision

Wentworth’s vision for the future is to become nationally recognized as the university of choice for externally-collaborative, project-based, interdisciplinary learning.

Institute Core Values

At Wentworth, our core values reflect that we are student-centered, that we are passionate for real-life, hands-on teaching and learning, and that innovation and creativity are at the center of what we do. We express these three core values as Students first – The world is our classroom –Thinking without a box.

 

 

 

Program Mission

The mission of the Construction Management program is to provide the student with both the education and work experience to enter the construction profession as a productive team member with the potential to become an innovative technical problem-solver and industry leader. The philosophy of the program is to offer a curriculum which emphasizes instruction that challenges, shapes and encourages students to think about and apply their expanding technical knowledge and organizational skills to the solution of contemporary problems. This philosophy is supported by the educational mission of the Institute that emphasizes physics and mathematics, both theoretical and applied, the humanities and social sciences, communication skills, and computer science. Students are prepared through their educational experience to adapt to changes in society, technology and the profession.

B.     Goals/Objectives

Institute Goals

In order to fulfill its mission, Wentworth has established the following Student Learning Goals expected of every graduate. These Learning Goals are reinforced in the classroom, laboratory and studio, and in cooperative education experiences and co-curricular opportunities. To this end we expect that all graduates of Wentworth be able to:

  • Locate information and evaluate it critically for its appropriateness and validity

  • Communicate effectively in written, spoken and visual formats

  • Acquire and use analytical tools and skills for evaluating information and solving problems

  • Identify the traits of good leadership

  • Acquire and use the skills needed for effective teamwork

  • Recognize and apply concepts of ethical behavior to personal and public issues

  • Explain the sustainable use of human, physical, and economic resources

  • Recognize and identify historical and contemporary societal and global issues

 

Program Goals

To accomplish the mission of the Construction Management program, the following goals have been developed for the Department in order to prepare students academically for personal and professional success in the built environment:

  • Deliver a construction management education program that is nationally accredited and continuously assessed and improved

  • Regularly meet with and advise students on their status related to the curriculum to ensure they understand the requirements for degree completion

  • Provide courses which develop the analytical tools and technical knowledge to evaluate information and solve problems as supervisors and managers in the construction industry

  • Provide courses which develop skills to lead and serve as members of interdisciplinary teams, as well as communicate in written, oral, and visual formats

  • Instill the professional ethical responsibilities of leaders and managers in the construction industry

C.     Learning Outcomes

The following learning outcomes are based on the ACCE recommendations and are the basis for the academic curriculum:

  1. Create written communications appropriate to the construction discipline.

  2. Create oral presentations appropriate to the construction discipline.

  3. Create a construction project safety plan.

  4. Create construction project estimates

  5. Create construction project schedules.

  6. Analyze professional decisions based upon ethical principles.

  7. Analyze construction documents for planning and management of construction processes.

  8. Analyze methods, materials, and equipment used on construction projects.

  9. Apply construction management skills as an effective member of a multi-disciplinary team.

  10. Apply electronic-based technology to manage the construction process.

  11. Apply basic surveying techniques for construction layout and control.

  12. Analyze different methods of project delivery and the roles and responsibilities of all constituencies involved in the design and construction process.

  13. Explain construction risk management.

  14. Explain construction accounting and cost control.

  15. Explain construction quality assurance and control.

  16. Explain construction project control processes.

  17. Explain the legal implications of contract, common, and regulatory law to manage a construction project.

  18. Explain the basic principles of sustainable construction.

  19. Demonstrate the basic principles of structural behavior.

  20. Demonstrate the basic principles of mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems.

D.    Performance Criteria

Indirect

  • Pre- and Post-Course Surveys

  • Student and Employer Co-op Surveys

  • Senior Exit Interview and Survey

  • Alumni Survey

Direct

  • Comprehensive Final Exam

  • Senior Project Industry Panel Evaluation

E.     Evaluation Methodology

The following are the assessment tools used by the CM department to evaluate the program.  Results of the tools are analyzed, and all areas of “Concern” or “Weakness” are reviewed by the CM Department.  Specific areas of “Concern” or “Weakness” that appear in multiple assessment tools or over multiple assessment periods are scrutinized and may be the impetus for revisions to a specific course or courses and/or to the curriculum. 

 

 

 

 

Pre- and Post-Course Surveys

Pre- and Post-Course Surveys are conducted for each course.  Questions are derived from the specific course learning objectives.  Each Pre- and Post-Course survey for a given course asks identical questions in order to compare student perceptions of their skills and knowledge at the beginning and end of each course. 

The assessment goal is for at least 70% of the students to “Strongly Agree” or “Agree” that they are able to meet each learning objectives at the end of the course.  If less than 70% of the students respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Concern”.  If less than 60% of the students respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Weakness”.

 

Student and Employer Co-op Surveys

Students evaluate their co-op experience via two surveys, one completed at mid-semester and the other at the end of the semester during each of the two required co-op semesters.  The Co-op Office conducts these surveys and subsequently summarizes the data.  The mid-semester survey is used by the co-op office to monitor the co-op experience of each student and to take quick action as problems arise.  The results of the end of semester survey are made available to the department during the next semester at the latest.

The co-op evaluation includes a component called the Employer evaluation of Co-op Student’s Performance which is done at semester’s end by each employer with respect to the individual student employed.  Once again, the Co-op office conducts the survey, summarizes the data and makes it available to the department usually in the following semester.

The summary results of both the end of semester student and co-op employer surveys are shared with the CM faculty.  They provide valuable, detailed feedback from students and industry in four major categories, each with several subcategories:

·         Technical Knowledge Skills

·         Managing Self & Tasks

·         Communicating

·         Creativity and Change

The assessment goal for the student co-op survey is to have the students respond with an overall rating of a positive 70%  of their Co-op experience.  If less than 70% rating in this category, it is considered an area of “Concern”.  If less than 60% rating it is considered an area of “Weakness”.

The assessment goal for the employer co-op survey is to have at least 70% of the employers respond “Outstanding”, “Above Average” or “Average” in the areas of competency surveyed.  If less than 70% of the employers respond in these three categories, it is considered an area of “Concern”.  If less than 60% of the employers respond in these three categories, it is considered an area of “Weakness”.

Senior Exit Interview and Survey

The Department Chair meets in the summer semester prior to graduation with all senior CM students.  The students also complete an anonymous on-line exit survey.  The interview and survey allow the students to express their approval, criticisms, and/or thoughts concerning courses and curriculum and are used to evaluate the CM program on an annual basis.  Results are shared and discussed with faculty during the fall semester.  Changes to courses and curriculum are influenced by the information gathered.

The assessment goal is for at least 70% of the student to respond in the top two categories for each question.  If less than 70% of the students respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Concern”.  If less than 60% of the students respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Weakness”.

 

Alumni Survey

Wentworth alumni are surveyed every six years.  Data is collected and summarized by the Alumni Office and reviewed by CM faculty.

The assessment goal is for at least 70% of the alumni to respond in the top two categories for each question.  If less than 70% of the alumni respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Concern”.  If less than 60% of the alumni respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Weakness”.

Comprehensive Final Examination

The Comprehensive Final Examination is given as the final exam in the CM Senior Project course, which is taken in the final semester.  The exam contains questions from all CM courses in the curriculum.  The grade on the exam is a portion of the final grade for the course. 

The assessment goal is for at least 70% of the students to correctly answer each questions on the exam.  If less than 70% of the students answer a question correctly, it is considered an area of “Concern”.  If less than 60% of the students answer a question correctly, it is considered an area of “Weakness”.

 

 

            Senior Project Industry Panel Evaluation

During Senior Project, members of the construction industry act as panelists for the final oral presentation.  After the presentations, the panelists are asked to evaluate the overall knowledge and skills of the CM students and their readiness to enter in the construction industry.

The assessment goal is for at least 70% of the industry members to “Strongly Agree” or “Agree” that students are able to meet each of the applicable learning objectives.  If less than 70% of the industry members respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Concern”.  If less than 60% of the industry members respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Weakness”.

II.    Assessment Implementation Plan

The table below summarizes the assessment schedule:

Assessment Tool

Frequency

Conducted By

Pre- and   Post-Course Surveys

Every semester

CM Department

Student and   Employer Co-op Surveys

Every co-op   semester

Co-op Office

Senior Exit   Interview and Survey

Annually

CM Department

Alumni Survey

Every six (6)   years

Alumni Office

Comprehensive   Final Examination

Annually

CM Department

Senior Project   Industry Panel Evaluation

Annually

CM Department

Results of the assessments are collected and areas of “Concern” or “Weakness” are identified.  Based upon the CM Department review, any needed revisions to courses and/or the curriculum are proposed, implemented and tracked.  See the following section for specific assessment results.

Pre- and Post-Course Surveys (Fall 2014)

*Note: The Course numbers in brackets designate the old course number

                Course: CONM 1000 (CONM105)* Introduction to CM

                Learning Objective: None reported.

                Numerical Score: None reported.

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score: Base year

                Related Concern or Weakness: There is no weakness or concern to report

                Discussion: None required.

                Proposed changes to course or curriculum:  None proposed.

Course: CONM1200 (CONM136)* Building Construction

                Learning Objective:  None reported.

                Numerical Score:  None reported.

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness: There is no weakness or concern to report

                Discussion:  None required.

                Proposed changes to course or curriculum:  None proposed.

Course: CONM2000 (CONM201)* Construction Surveying

                Learning Objective: None reported.

Numerical Score:  None reported.

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year. 

Related Concern or Weakness: There is no weakness or concern to report

                Discussion:

                Proposed changes to course or curriculum:  None proposed.

 

Course: CONM2200 (CONM265)* Construction Estimating

                Learning Objective:  None reported.

                Numerical Score:  None reported.

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness: There is no weakness or concern to report

                Discussion: The students did have adequate plan reading skills.  Lab time was used to improve this skill.

Proposed changes to course or curriculum:  More time should be spent on Preliminary estimates, as that category is new to the students.

Course: CONM2100 (CONM242)* Statics & Strength of Materials

Learning Objective:  None reported.               

                Numerical Score:  None reported.

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness: There is no weakness or concern to report

                Discussion:  None required.

Proposed changes to course or curriculum:  None proposed.

 

Course: CONM3200 (CONM406)* Construction Project Scheduling

Learning Objective: I can develop resource and cost loaded construction Schedule using different scheduling methods

                Numerical Score: 61

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score

Related Concern or Weakness:

Discussion: This learning objectives will be focused on in this fall to improve the students learning. This is a concern that will be fixed.

Proposed changes to course or curriculum: It was previously decided to increase to four credits.

 

 

 

Course: CONM3100 (CONM410)* Construction Project Management

Learning Objective:  None reported.

                Numerical Score:  None reported.

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness: There is no weakness or concern to report.

Discussion:  None required.

Proposed changes to course or curriculum:  None proposed.

 

Course: CONM3000 (CONM360)* Materials Testing & Quality Control

                Learning Objective:  None reported.

Numerical Score:  None reported.

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.   

Related Concern or Weakness: There is no weakness or concern to report

Discussion: Based on the results of previous year’s survey, there was more emphasis placed on quality control and quality control programs.  These changes resulted in higher achievement rates for the relevant questions in this year’s survey.

Proposed changes to course or curriculum: There are some labs which need slight modifications to make the assignment clearer and the lab result more relevant to the course.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pre- and Post-Course Surveys (Spring 2015)

*Note: The Course numbers in brackets designate the old course number

                Course: CONM 1500 (CONM118)* Construction Graphics

                Learning Objective:  None reported.

                Numerical Score:  None reported.

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

                Related Concern or Weakness: There is no weakness or concern to report.

                Discussion:  None required.

                Proposed changes to course or curriculum:  None proposed.

Course: CONM1600 (CONM150)* Heavy Construction

                Learning Objective:  None reported.   

                Numerical Score: None reported.

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness: There is no weakness or concern to report.

                Discussion:  None required.

                Proposed changes to course or curriculum: None proposed.

Course: CONM2500 (CONM290)* Building Systems (New course) Not evaluated. See 2016 report.

                Learning Objective: 

Numerical Score:  .

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:

Related Concern or Weakness:

                Discussion:

                Proposed changes to course or curriculum None proposed

 

 

 

Course: CONM2600 (CONM404)* Wood and Steel Analysis and Design

                Learning Objective: L.O.7 Apply AISC Guidelines to design of columns, tension members, and beams.

                Numerical Score: 55.5%

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

                Related Concern or Weakness:

              Discussion:  None required.

              Proposed changes to course or curriculum: None at this time.

                Learning Objective: L.O.11 Apply AF & PA NDS to design of structural wood elements.

                Numerical Score: 27.8%

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness:  Students may have been confused with the “AF & PA NDS” acronym since 67% of respondents answered “uncertain” to this question on the survey.

Discussion:  Acronym will be replaced with the actual names.

Proposed changes to course or curriculum:  Results from next year’s report will be analyzed prior to any changes.

Course: CONM4000 (CONM580)* Construction Project Control

                Learning Objective:  None reported.

                Numerical Score:  None reported.

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base Year.

Related Concern or Weakness: There is no weakness or concern to report.

Discussion: Of the 3 lab sections this semester, two worked on a semester long tenant fit-out project that was designed to demonstrate how project control systems could be applied to a real project.  The third lab section worked collaboratively with architectural and civil engineering technology majors on the development of a parcel at the site of the former Medfield Hospital. Each group was asked to evaluate their experience and to comment on how the lab experience could be improved.  All of the students working on the tenant fit-out felt it was successful in demonstrating how project control systems worked.  A few thought that the various scenarios they were presented with got overly involved and hard to follow.  A few students had problems with the software (P6) that persisted all semester long. 

Students working on the collaboration felt it was an excellent learning experience but some expressed frustration with their architectural partners for not getting important detailed drawings and other information to them in a timely fashion.  Also, they were concerned that the architectural students were instructed to produce designs without regard to budgetary and time constraints, which seemed to them to fly in the face of what the CM’s role was in the collaboration.

Proposed changes to course or curriculum:  The tenant fit-out project should be reviewed with an eye for simplifying some of the scenarios that are presented to the students. 

 Prior to embarking on a future collaborative project with the architectural and/or civil departments, faculty involved in the last collaboration should de-brief and attempt to address some of the students’ concerns.

               

Course: CONM4100 (CONM595)* Construction Business and Finance

Learning Objective: L.O. 1 Students have the opportunity to research the United States entrepreneurship programs.

                Numerical Score: 59.46%

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness: Students have difficulty in doing independent research and fulfilling the technical writing requirement of this course.

Discussion:  No action required at this time.

Proposed Changes:  No action required at this time.

Learning Objective: L.O. 5 Students have the opportunity to develop the marketing process in business development process as utilized in the construction industry.

                Numerical Score: 64.87%

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness:

Discussion:  No action required at this time.

Proposed Changes:  No action required at this time.

Learning Objective: L.O. 7 Students have the opportunity to apply principles of marketing professional services to the semester project.

                Numerical Score: 67.57%

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness:

Discussion:  No action required at this time.

Proposed Changes:  No action required at this time.

Learning Objective: L.O. 15 Students have the opportunity to prepare feasibility studies and business plans for a construction business and projects.

                Numerical Score: 61.12%

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness:

Discussion:  No action required at this time.

Proposed Changes:  No action required at this time.

Learning Objective: L.O. 17 Explain construction accounting and cost control.

                Numerical Score: 58.33%

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness:

Discussion:  No action required at this time.

Proposed changes:  No action required at this time.

Learning Objective: L.O. 19 Explain construction project control processes.

                Numerical Score: 66.66%

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness:

Discussion:  No action required at this time.

Proposed changes:  No action required at this time.

Learning Objective: L.O. 20 Summarize construction risk management.

                Numerical Score: 67.57%

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score: Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness:

Discussion:  No action required at this time.

Proposed changes:  No action required at this time.

Learning Objective: L.O. 21 Describe the legal implications of contract, common, and regulatory law to manage a construction project.

                Numerical Score: 67.57%

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness:

Discussion:  No action required at this time.

Proposed changes:  No action required at this time.

Learning Objective: L.O. 23 Students have the opportunity to apply the principles of team dynamics.

                Numerical Score: 64.86%

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness:

Discussion: None required at this time.  

Proposed changes: None required at this time.

Course: CONM4200 (CONM625)* Construction Safety and Risk Management

Learning Objective:  None reported.

                Numerical Score: None reported

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness: There is no weakness or concern to report.

Discussion:  Open book exam format was continued this year and seems appropriate for this course.  The FRPG assignment was changed to provide a blank FRPG that is filled out by the students. This change was judged a success based on observations of the instructor and feedback from students.  This change will be maintained for the future.

Proposed changes to course or curriculum:  None required at this time.

 

 

 

Pre- and Post-Course Surveys (Summer 2015)

*Note: The Course numbers in brackets designate the old course number

Course: CONM 3500 (CONM 430)* Advanced Construction Estimating

                Learning Objective:  None reported.

                Numerical Score:  None reported.

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score: Base year.

                Related Concern or Weakness:  None at this time.

Discussion: More time was spent on preconstruction and construction costs this semester since students seemed to have difficulty understanding the concept of preconstruction and construction costs as a budgeting process.  “On Screen” estimating software was used again and was received very favorably.

                Proposed changes to course or curriculum:  None required at this time.

Course: CONM 3600 (CONM 473)* Concrete Analysis and Design

Learning Objective: L.O. 10  I can determine lateral pressures acting on retaining walls and check potential failure modes.

                Numerical Score: 55%

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness:  The low response rate to this L.O. is a consequence of that fact that there was not sufficient time to show numeric examples related to the topic in question. Students were exposed to retaining walls in the last lecture session but because the semester ended on a Tuesday there was no lab following the lecture to present numeric examples.

                Discussion: The amount of time allotted to each topic in the course should be reviewed and adjusted                            accordingly to allow more time to cover the subject of retaining walls. 

Proposed changes to course or curriculum:  Changes will be made to account for changes in schedule.

Course: CONM4600 (CONM670)* Construction Law and Government Regulations

                Learning Objective:  None reported.

                Numerical Score:  None reported.   

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score: Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness: None required at this time.

                Discussion:  None required at this time.

Proposed changes to course or curriculum: None required at this time.

Course: CONM5500 (CONM650)* CM Senior Project

                Learning Objective:  None reported.

                Numerical Score:  None reported.

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness: None required at this time.

                Discussion:  None required at this time.  

Proposed changes to course or curriculum:  None required at this time.

Student and Employer Co-op Surveys

 

Results of the End of Semester Employer Co-op Survey for the Fall of 2014

 

In the fall of 2014, 74 seniors in the CM program successfully completed the required co-op semester.  At the end of the term, supervisors were asked to rate the ability of students under their purview as to their abilities in the 27 categories shown in the table by answering “Outstanding”, “Above Average”, “Average”, “Needs to Improve” and “Do Not Know” as applicable.  A total of 50 surveys were completed.  The percentages given in the table are based on the combined number of “Outstanding”, “Above Average” and “Average” responses as compared to the total number of responses excluding the “Do Not Know”s in each category.

In addition to rating the students, supervisors were asked to describe their co-op’s work assignment. They were also asked to provide comments or suggestions for the further development of the student’s professional abilities, communication skills, ability to manage self and tasks, and ability to be creative and adapt to change.  Their comments are summarized in the attachment to this page.

Category

Percent

Overall   Performance

100

Understands   Pricing and Cost Estimating

100

Understands   the Project Management Process

100

Uses   and Develops Schedules

100

Applies   Electronic-Based Technology to Manage the Construction Process

100

Understands   Risk Issues

100

Analyzes   Construction Documents for Planning and Management of the Construction   Process

96

Understands   and Applies Safety Standards

98

Analyzes   Methods, Materials, and Equipment Used to Construct Projects

98

Applies   Basic Surveying Techniques for Construction Layout and Control

100

Understands   Construction Accounting and Cost Control

100

Understands   the Basic Principles of Sustainable Construction

100

Learning/Contemporary   Issues

100

Problem   Solving

100

Personal   Strengths

100

Written   Communication

98

Verbal   Communication

96

Listening

100

Interpersonal   Skills

100

Managing   Conflict

98

Creativity,   Innovation & Change

100

Ability   to Conceptualize

100

Risk   Taking

98

Professional   & Ethical Responsibility

100

Multi-Disciplinary   Teams

100

Visual   Communication

100

Personal   Organization & Time Management

100

Conclusion:  The overall goal was to attain at least a 70% achievement rate for each category for the combined “Outstanding”, “Above Average” and “Average” responses.  This was achieved in every category, and in fact, was greatly exceeded in all. 

Comments or suggestions from supervisors regarding further development of the student in the areas previously mentioned tended to be very specific to the individual student.  Common themes that did emerge included the following:

  • Professional abilities should improve over time with more exposure to the industry especially with regard to how a project comes together, contract administration, and the cost/budget side of construction.

  • Ask more questions.

  • Be more confident in your abilities; be more assertive.

  • Challenge current procedures/systems more; take more risks; share your ideas more.

Positive comments that emerged included:

  • Very eager to learn.

  • Worked well with the team.

  • Projected a positive attitude.

  • Performed assigned tasks with diligence and in a timely manner.

  • Adapted very well to changing tasks and priorities. 

Results of the End of Semester Student Co-op Survey for the Fall of 2014

 

In the fall of 2014, 74 seniors in the CM program successfully completed the required co-op semester.  At the end of the term the students were asked to rate the co-op experience as a whole and how it changed their understanding or improved their abilities in the specific areas listed in the table that follows. With respect to their abilities, students were asked to respond with “Increased Significantly”, “Increased Slightly”, “No Change” or “Decreased Slightly” as appropriate.  Seventy two students responded to the survey. The percentages given in the table are based on the combined number of “Increased Significantly” and “Increased Slightly” responses as compared to the total number provided in each category.

In addition to the above, students were asked to provide written comments on the following as they related to their co-op experience:

  • Development of work/professional skills.

  • Describe two ways in which you’ve demonstrated an ability to be creative and adapt to change.  In what way could you improve?

  • Describe an instance in which you applied knowledge learned in the classroom to a situation at your co-op.

  • How did your co-op help you identify your career goals? How has it provided you a better understanding of your chosen career?

  • List any software/tools that you could have benefitted from knowing before starting te co-op.

Overall Rating of Co-op Experience:

61 students (85%) rated their co-op experience as “Outstanding” or “Above Average”

11 students (15%) rated the experience as “Average”

0 students (0%) rated the experience as “Below Average”

0 student (0%) rated it is as poor.

 


 

 

Results of the End of Semester Employer Co-op Survey for the Spring of 2015

 

In the spring of 2015, 68 juniors in the CM program successfully completed the required co-op semester.  At the end of the term, supervisors were asked to rate the ability of students under their purview as to their abilities in the 17 categories shown in the table by answering “Outstanding”, “Above Average”, “Average”, “Needs to Improve” and “Do Not Know” as applicable. The percentages given in the table are based on the combined number of “Outstanding”, “Above Average” and “Average” responses as compared to the total number of responses excluding the “Do Not Know”s in each category.

In addition to rating the students, supervisors were asked to describe their co-op’s work assignment and to list any software or tools that would have been beneficial for the student to have been familiar with before starting the co-op.  Supervisors were also asked to provide comments or suggestions for the further development of the student’s professional abilities, communication skills, ability to manage self and tasks, and ability to be creative and adapt to change.  Their comments are summarized in the attachment to this page.

Category

Percent

Overall   Performance

95.6

Learning   Contemporary Issues

97.8

Problem   Solving

91.3

Planning   & Organizing

97.8

Written   Communication

97.8

Verbal   Communication

100

Listening

97.8

Interpersonal

100

Managing   Conflict

96.9

Creativity,   Innovation & Change

97.7

Ability   to Conceptualize

95.3

Risk   Taking

96.8

Life-Long   Learning

97.6

Professional   & Ethical Responsibility

100

Multi-Disciplinary   Teams

100

Visual   Communication

95.0

Personal   Organization & Time Management

97.8

Conclusion:  The overall goal was to attain at least a 70% achievement rate for each category for the combined “Outstanding”, “Above Average” and “Average” responses.  This was achieved in every category, and in fact, was greatly exceeded in all. 

With respect to prior knowledge of software or tools that would have benefitted the students on co-op, the following were mentioned:

  • Excel (7 times)

  • On Screen Takeoff (5 times)

  • Bluebeam (5 times)

  • BIM related software - BIM 360, Navisworks, Synchro  (4 times)

  • Timberline  Project Management (3 times)

Comments or suggestions from supervisors regarding further development of the student in the areas previously mentioned tended to be very specific to the individual student.  Common themes that did emerge included the following:

  • Professional abilities should improve over time with more exposure to the industry especially with regard to how a project comes together, contract administration, and the cost/budget side of construction.

  • Ask more questions.

  • Be more confident in your abilities; be more assertive.

  • Challenge current procedures/systems more; take more risks.

Positive comments that emerged included:

  • Very eager to learn.

  • Projected a positive attitude.

  • Performed assigned tasks with diligence and in a timely manner.

  • Adapted very well to changing tasks and priorities.


 

Results of the End of Semester Employer Co-op Survey for the Summer of 2015

 

In the summer of 2015, 35 sophomores in the CM program successfully completed the optional co-op semester.  At the end of the term, supervisors were asked to rate the ability of students under their purview as to their abilities in the 17 categories shown in the table by answering “Outstanding”, “Above Average”, “Average”, “Needs to Improve” and “Do Not Know” as applicable.  A total of 23 surveys were completed.  The percentages given in the table below are based on the combined number of “Outstanding”, “Above Average” and “Average” responses as compared to the total number of responses excluding the “Do Not Know”s in each category.

In addition to rating the students, supervisors were asked to describe their co-op’s work assignment and to list any software or tools that would have been beneficial for the student to have been familiar with before starting the co-op.  Supervisors were also asked to provide comments or suggestions for the further development of the student’s professional abilities, communication skills, ability to manage self and tasks, and ability to be creative and adapt to change.  Their comments are summarized in the attachment to this page.

Category

Percent

Overall   Performance

95.7

Learning   Contemporary Issues

100

Problem   Solving

100

Planning   & Organizing

95.5

Written   Communication

95.2

Verbal   Communication

100

Listening

91.3

Interpersonal

100

Managing   Conflict

100

Creativity,   Innovation & Change

100

Ability   to Conceptualize

95.0

Risk   Taking

94.4

Life-Long   Learning

95.7

Professional   & Ethical Responsibility

100

Multi-Disciplinary   Teams

100

Visual Communication

100

Personal   Organization & Time Management

100

 

Conclusion:  The overall goal was to attain at least a 70% achievement rate for each category for the combined “Outstanding”, “Above Average” and “Average” responses.  This was achieved in every category, and in fact, was greatly exceeded in all. 

With respect to prior knowledge of software or tools that would have benefitted the students on co-op, the following were mentioned:

  • On Screen Takeoff (8 times)

  • BIM related software - BIM 360, Navisworks, Synchro (5 times)

  • Bluebeam (3 times)

  • Timberline  Project Management (3 times)

  • Excel (3 times)

  • AutoCAD (3 times)

Comments or suggestions from supervisors regarding further development of the student in the areas previously mentioned tended to be very specific to the individual student.  Common themes that did emerge included the following:

  • Continued growth and confidence will come with more experience.

Positive comments that emerged included:

  • Very eager to learn and quick to grasp things.

  • Very dependable; good work ethic.

  • Adapted very well to change.

 

 

Senior Exit Interview (Summer 2015)

Results of Senior Exit Survey (Summer 2015)

Toward the end of their last semester, seniors in the CM program were surveyed to determine their opinion regarding the effectiveness of Wentworth’s curriculum in advancing their professional development and preparing them for entry into the work force.  They were also asked to rate the quality of the facilities, and the effectiveness of the administrative and support staff in supporting them throughout their time at Wentworth, and their level of satisfaction with the overall educational experience.  They were also asked about their expected employment status after graduation, as well as their expected job title/description and salary.  Forty students participated in the survey.

Employment Status After Graduation:

 

Status

Responses

Percentage

Job   in construction or related field

22

55

Job   unrelated to construction

1

2.5

Still   looking for a job

17

42.5

Planning   on going back to school full time

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Job Title/Description:

 

Title/Description

Responses

Percentage

Project   Manager

2

9.52

Asst.   Project Manager

5

23.81

Superintendent

0

0.00

Asst.   Superintendent

3

14.29

Project   Engineer

6

28.57

Asst.   Project Engineer

1

4.76

Field   Engineer

1

4.76

Construction   Engineer

0

0.00

Estimator

2

9.52

Scheduler

1

4.76

Other

1

4.76

 

Salary After Graduation:

Salary Range

Reponses

Percentage

Less   than $35,000

0

0.00

$35,000   to $39,999

1

4.55

$40,000   to $44,999

0

0.00

$45,000   to $49,999

0

0.00

$50,000   to $54,999

5

22.73

$55,000   to $60,000

10

45.45

Greater   than $60,000

6

27.27

 

Effectiveness of WIT’s CM Curriculum:

Students were asked to rate the effectiveness of the curriculum in 15 subject areas by answering “Outstanding”, “Good”, “Fair” or “Poor”.  The following table shows the subject areas and the percentage of students that answered in the top two categories in each.

 

Subject Area

Percentage

Mathematics   & Basic Science

74.36

Humanities/Social   Science

58.99

Construction   Surveying & Layout

92.30

Ethics

82.06

Estimating

79.49

Accounting   & Finance

82.05

Construction   Law

83.80

Project   Management

94.73

Analysis   & Design of Structural Systems

94.88

Construction   Materials

97.43

Plan   Reading & Graphics

76.93

Planning   & Scheduling

76.92

Principles   of Business Management

64.11

Safety

100.00

Understanding   Basic Principles of Mechanical & Electrical Systems

33.33

 

 

Quality of the Facilities:

Students were asked to rate the quality of Wentworth’s facilities as “Excellent”, “Good”, “Average”, “Fair” or ”Poor”.  The following table shows the percentages of students that rated each of the listed facilities in the top three categories.

 

Facility

Percentage

Departmental   Laboratories

97.44

Library

82.04

Classrooms

97.18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Effectiveness of Administrative & Support Services:

Students were asked to rate the effectiveness of administrative and support services as “Excellent”, “Good”, “Average”, “Fair” or ”Poor”.  The following table shows the percentages of students that answered in the top three categories in each service area.

 

Administrative/Support   Service

Percentage

Student   Advising

87.18

Co-op   Office

89.74

Career   Services

92.31

 

Student advising was rated “poor” by 2 students (5.13%) while the co-op office and career services were each rated “Poor” by one student (2.58%).

 

Value of Co-op Work Experience to Overall Education:

Rating

Students

Percentage

Extremely   Valuable

34

87.18

Valuable

5

12.82

Somewhat   Valuable

0

0.00

Less   Valuable

0

0.00

Not   Valuable at All

0

0.00

Effectiveness of Wentworth Education in Preparing You for the Work Force:

Rating

Students

Percentage

Highly   Effective

13

33.33

Effective

24

61.54

Somewhat   Effective

2

5.13

Less   Than Effective

0

0.00

Not   Effective at All

0

0.00

Overall Satisfaction with the Wentworth Educational Experience:

Rating

Students

Percentage

Extremely   Satisfied

16

46.15

Very   Satisfied

13

33.33

Satisfied

8

20.51

Somewhat   Satisfied

0

0.00

Not   Satisfied

0

0.00

 

 

 

Evaluation of Survey Results:

The data indicates that senior students were highly satisfied with their educational experience at Wentworth. They felt their education was effective in preparing them to enter the work force upon graduation and that co-op was a valuable part of that preparation. With 100% of students responding in the top three categories to these three questions, the goal of 70% was greatly exceeded.

Student responses to the questions regarding administrative and support services revealed an overall level of satisfaction with the advising system, the Co-op Office and Career Services. With regard to the facilities, students rated the quality of the departmental laboratories, the library and the classrooms highly.  Well over 70% of student responses were in the top three categories for each area, once again exceeding the goal.  It should be noted that 7 students out of 40 did rate the library as only fair to poor.   This is expected to change once Wentworth implements the upgrades that are currently being planned for the library facility.

With respect to the effectiveness of the curriculum, the goal of having 70% of respondents answering in the top two categories was exceeded in all but three subject areas.  Students felt that the curriculum was good to outstanding in the areas of math & science, construction surveying and layout, estimating, accounting and finance, construction law, project management, analysis and design of structural systems, construction materials, plan reading and graphics, planning and scheduling, and safety.  The three areas that fell below 70% were: humanities and social sciences, principles of business management, and understanding basic principles of mechanical and electrical systems.  It should be noted that significant changes were made to the mechanical and electrical systems course that were implemented after these students took the original version.  The rating for this area of the curriculum is expected to improve once students who are currently sophomores have taken the new version of this course.  The business and finance course is currently under review.  As for the humanities/social science area, it has always been the case that some CM students feel it is a non-essential part of their curriculum.  However, student opinions should be shared with the humanities/social sciences faculty to determine if any action should be taken.

Finally, a review of the employment and salary data reveals that students are being employed in positions that are appropriate for recent graduates of a baccalaureate CM program. Salaries appear to be commensurate with their educational background and level of exposure to the construction industry.

 

 

Senior Exit Interview Individual Comments

  • Safety class before co-op

  • Logistics course, maybe an elective, with project Management

  • Class during project management with loopholes and practices

  • Graphics class too early

  • Get rid of RS Means, TSI software?

  • Life in Construction Lane-a waste

  • More elective classes-sales and advertising course?

  • Use Boston Fire and Safety Plan NFG 241?

  • Take Labor Relations before interviewing for jobs-make it more of life skills course

  • Building Systems-more outside lecturers and 3D modeling

  • Optional CM elective required only once-may want to take two courses

  • EPIC not working with Architecture students as they did not meet schedule

  • Better Senior Project-more time on presentation than on proposal suggested.

  • Freshmen year classes waste of time-same as senior high school year

  • In class assignments in senior project lab-did not have the one hour promised with the lab professor

  • Power and Leadership a joke. Depends on who taught it. Some students loved the class.

  • Steps for Design courses, less paper work, more hands on

  • Construction Site Logistics class needed-in project management class

  • Construction Law class needs to be more construction content

  • Construction Project controls EPIC lab linked with Architecture students did not work as they did not provide the information needed on time.

  • Better access to technology, access to other software?

  • Senior Project: Three sections of lecture at same time good especially for guest lectures. One topic per class too much otherwise and should be spread out over the two lectures during the week.

  • Standardize the senior projects-all labs the same process. Deliverables not always related to what was in project.  Middle point items DUE to close together. Not enough time.

  • Staffing in senior projects needs to change.

  • Procurement on Senior Project

  • Timberline? Why not using?

  • Life In Construction Lane, Electrical Building system, Mechanical Building systems and Graphics not good classes. (all of these have changed since they took them)

 

Alumni Survey (2012)

CM Alumni surveys are conducted by the department every six years.  Data is collected, summarized and reviewed by CM faculty and shared with the rest of the department.  The latest survey was conducted during the spring and summer semester 2012.  It should be noted that assessment datea from all sources, including surveys, is shared and discussed with the CM IAB at the discretion of the CM Department Chair and program faculty at the bi-annual IAB meetings.

CM   Alumni Survey

(combined   top two ratings)

Rate effectiveness of   Wentworth’s curriculum in developing the skills below:

  Communicate effectively

81%

  Acquire and use analytical tools and skills

85%

  Identify traits of good leadership

86%

  Acquire and use skills for effective   teamwork

90%

  Recognize and apply concepts of ethical   behavior

72%

  Explain sustainable use of resources

54%

  Recognize and identify societal and global   issues

45%

Rate effectiveness of   Wentworth’s curriculum in the subject areas below:

  Math and Basic Science

72%

  Humanities/Social Science

86%

  Construction Surveying and Layout

91%

  Ethics

60%

  Estimating

90%

  Accounting and Finance

65%

  Construction Law

86%

  Project Management

86%

  Analysis and Design of Structural Systems

90%

  Construction Materials

95%

  Plan Reading and Graphics

85%

  Planning and Scheduling

76%

  Business

76%

  Safety

90%

  Mech/Elect

45%

Rate effectiveness of   administrative and support services below:

Advising

54%

Co-op office

68%

Career Services

59%

How valuable was your   Co-op experience?

90%

How effective was   Wentworth in preparing your for the workforce immediately upon graduation?

91%

How effective was   Wentworth in providing a suitable foundation for professional advancement?

100%

Analysis

Rate effectiveness of Wentworth’s curriculum in developing skills.

The CM program has provided the student with the skills that are required for a successful career in construction management.  The survey shows the following skills have achieved an acceptable level (70% or greater)

  • Communications

  • Use of Analytical Skills

  • Leadership

  • Teamwork

  • Ethical Behavior

The analysis clearly shows that the Co-op experience was very valuable.  The most important survey question “How effective was Wentworth in providing a suitable foundation for professional advancement?” definitively shows that the alumni feel that the Wentworth education, and in particular their CM education, was outstanding.

Areas to be improved upon

  • Sustainable Construction

Status – the department offered a Sustainable Construction course in the Summer of 2012

  • Mechanical/Electrical

Status – the course has been changed from a design course to a construction/estimating focus with equipment identification.

 

Comprehensive Final Examination (Summer 2015)

Course CONM 2000 (CONM201)*

Question: Multiple Choice Question #16 (ACCE LO#11) If the azimuth from north of a property line is 285°25’39”, which of the following shows the correct bearing for this line?

  1. N15°25’39”W
  2. N74°34’21”W
  3. S74°34’21”W
  4. S15°25’39”W

Numerical Score: 69.41

Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness:  None required at this time.

                Discussion:  Track and review 2016.

                Proposed changes to course or curriculum:  None required at this time.

 

Course CONM 2100 (CONM242)*

Question: Multiple choice question # 20 ACCE LO #19 Calculate the moment of inertia about the x-axis (lx) for the following section:

                       6”

       3”                                                                                                                                                                                                    

a. 18 in2

b. 24 in4

c. 36 in4

d. 54 in4

Numerical Score: 68.08

                Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness:  None required at this time.

                Discussion:  Track and review 2016.

                Proposed changes to course or curriculum: None required at this time.

Course CONM 2600 (CONM404)* Wood & Steel Analysis & Design

Question: Multiple Choice Question #34 (ACCE LO#19) Finish the following statement to make it TRUE.

For a steel member in tension, tension rupture is a_______________

  1. Ductile failure that occurs near a connection
  2. Ductile failure that occurs away from a connection
  3. Brittle failure that occurs near a connection
  4. Brittle failure that occurs away from  a connection

Numerical Score: 38.89

Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness:  None required at this time.

                Discussion:  Track and review 2016.

                Proposed changes to course or curriculum:  None required at this time.

Course CONM 3100(CONM410)* Construction Project Management

Question: Multiple Choice Question #41 (ACCE LO#7) Name three cost items within the GMP that need to be monitored by the CM and Owner on a monthly basis after the CM’s GMP is approved.

  1. Change orders
  2. General Requirements
  3. Use of CM Contingency
  4. General Conditions

Numerical Score: 38.89

Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness: Understanding the mechanics of CM at Risk with GMP

Discussion: An attempt is being made to clarify this issue in different ways, graphically and through the explanation of the contractual agreements which lays out the mechanics of CM at Risk and the GMP.

                Proposed changes to course or curriculum: None required at this time.

Course CONM 3500(CONM430)* Advanced Estimating and Bid Analysis

Question: Multiple Choice Question #46 (ACCE LO#14) The annual sales volume is $10,000,000, the annual office expenses are $42,000, job trailer costs $20,000 per month and winter condition cost are $100,000 per month for 5 months. What is the home office overhead (%)?

  1. 7%
  2. 10%
  3. 5%
  4. None of the above

Numerical Score: 68.02

Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness:  None required at this time. 

Discussion: Track and review 2016.

                Proposed changes to course or curriculum: None required at this time.

Course CONM 3600(CONM473)* Concrete Analysis and Design

Question: Multiple Choice Question #48 (ACCE LO#19) A simply supported beam must be designed to span 30 feet and carry a total factored load of 2 kips per foot. What maximum bending moment must the beam be capable of supporting?

  1. 60 k-ft
  2. 225 k-ft.
  3. 450 k-ft
  4. 900 k-ft

Numerical Score: 69.43

Previous Assessment Cycle Score:  Base year.

Related Concern or Weakness: None required at this time.

Discussion: Track and review 2016.

                Proposed changes to course or curriculum:

 

 

 

 

Senior Project Industry Panel Evaluation (Summer 2015)

Below is the outcome of Industry Evaluation of the presentations (Written and Oral) of the senior Capstone Project. The outcome is indicative of the accomplishments the students have as demonstrated to the professionals in industry.

Question

Total of Strongly   agree and Agree

  1.   I am   a __________.

  1.   Wentworth   CM students are able to create written communications appropriate to the   construction discipline.

100.00

  1.   Wentworth   CM students are able to create oral presentations appropriate to the   construction discipline.

100.00

  1.   Wentworth   CM students are able to create a project safety plan.

93.75

  1.   Wentworth   CM students are able to create construction project estimates.

100.00

  1.   Wentworth   CM students are able to analyze construction documents for planning and   management of construction processes.

100.00

  1.   Wentworth   CM students are able to analyze methods, materials, and equipment used on   construction projects.

100.00

  1.   Wentworth   CM students are able to apply electronic-based technology to manage the   construction process.

93.75

  1.   Wentworth   CM students are able to explain construction risk management.

81.25

  1. Wentworth CM students are able to explain construction   quality assurance and control.

87.50

  1. Wentworth CM students are able to explain construction   project control processes.

100.00

  1. Wentworth CM students are able to describe the basic   principles of sustainable construction.

81.25