Accreditation

The Department of Construction Management at Wentworth Institute of Technology is an American Council for Construction Education accredited school since 2000. Construction Management has been an integral academic element of Wentworth since its founding in 1911.

The Department  of Construction Management is a cohesive group of experienced faculty and staff working together to provide students a nationally recognized and accredited construction management education.


Academic Quality Improvement Plan

The Quality Improvement Plan (QIP) will be the basis for continuous improvement of the four-year Bachelor of Science in Construction Management (BSCM) at Wentworth Institute of Technology (hereafter “Wentworth” or “the Institute”).  The QIP has three major components:

  • a Strategic Plan for the Construction Management Department

  • an Assessment Plan

  • the Assessment Implementation Plan

  1. Strategic Plan

    The Construction Management (CM) Department strives for continuous improvement in order to remain relevant as a provider of education in the continuously evolving construction industry.

The CM Department uses various constituencies (i.e. current students, alumni, faculty, administrators, employers, industrial advisors, and accreditors) in a structured assessment procedure that uses quantitative and qualitative data gathered from a variety of sources on a regular basis to affect change and improvement in the program as needed.  Implementation is spearheaded by the Department Chair in concert with CM faculty.  It should be noted that any action taken as a result of assessment to modify the curriculum begins at the CM program level with recommendations being made to the Department Chair by the CM faculty. Before implementation, these recommendations must be approved by the Institute Curriculum Committee and ultimately by the Vice President for Academic Affairs/Provost.

Data are collected from the various constituencies for assessment purposes.  These data are evaluated regularly in relation to the course and department goals and learning objectives.  Outcome assessment results are correlated with mission, goals, program content, and outcomes to implement change where needed.  Changes, if required, are proposed, discussed, and voted upon by the CM faculty.  It should be noted that assessment data from all sources, as well as proposed changes to the curriculum, are shared and discussed with the Industry Advisory Board (IAB) at the bi-annual meetings. 

The following is provided to establish the adequacy of resources available to the department:

Ten full-time faculty members are in the Construction Management department.  The table below summarizes information about faculty:

 

 

 

 

Name

Rank

FTE

Degree/Certification

Years on Staff

Bhatti, Ilyas

Associate

1.0

M.S. / PE

6

Bakhshi, Payam

Assistant

1.0

Ph.D.

4

Cosma, Cristina

Associate

1.0

Ph.D. / PE

10

Hasso, Mark

Full

1.0

Ph.D. / PE

28

Johnson, Todd

Assistant

1.0

M.S. / CPC

6

Kearney, William

Assistant

1.0

M.S. / CCM

3

Simon, Erik

Assistant

1.0

Ph.D. / CPC

3

Snow, Monica

Associate

1.0

Ph.D. / PE

8

Sumner, Scott

Associate

1.0

M.S. / CCM

11

Taddeo, Thomas

Associate

1.0

M.S.

37

 

All day students and faculty members receive laptops through Wentworth.  Therefore, almost any classroom can become a computer lab.  The students have access to software such as Primavera Project Management (P6), MS Office, On-Screen Takeoff, MS Project, and Revit.

The Department maintains five separate laboratory facilities that are utilized for instruction in the program.  The table below describes each laboratory, its size, major pieces of equipment, and the courses that utilize the particular laboratory.  All laboratories are clean, properly lit and ventilated, secure and well maintained.

 

Building

Room

Area (ft2)

Name

Equipment

Courses

Annex North

005

310

Survey Locker

-Total stations

-Automatic levels

-Pipe laser

-Digital theodolite

-Global positioning system

-Construction Surveying

Annex Central

007

1,249

Aggregate Testing Lab

-Compression machine

-Sieve shaker with assorted sieves

-Drying ovens

-Scales

-Compaction equipment

-Materials Testing and Quality Control

Annex Central

012

3,604

Concrete Lab

-Concrete mixers

-Curing tank

-Scales

-Materials Testing

-Building Construction

-Heavy Construction

Annex Central

N/A

3,951

Jobsite Lab

-Jobsite trailer

-Concrete forms

-Masonry mixer

-Static displays

-Building Construction

Annex South

002

004

3,861

CM Project Lab

-Workstations with 22” monitors

-Laser printer

-Construction Estimating

-Advanced Estimating

-Senior Project

-Construction Graphics

 

Assessment Pan

The Assessment Plan includes the following:

·         Mission Statement

·         Goals and Objectives

·         Learning Outcomes

·         Performance Criteria

·         Evaluation Methodology

 

A.    Mission Statement

Institute Mission

Wentworth's core purpose and mission is to empower, inspire and innovate through experiential learning.  Do.  Learn.  Succeed.

Institute Vision

Wentworth’s vision for the future is to become nationally recognized as the university of choice for externally-collaborative, project-based, interdisciplinary learning.

Institute Core Values

At Wentworth, our core values reflect that we are student-centered, that we are passionate for real-life, hands-on teaching and learning, and that innovation and creativity are at the center of what we do. We express these three core values as Students first – The world is our classroom –Thinking without a box.

 

 

 

           

Program Mission

The mission of the Construction Management program is to provide the student with both the education and work experience to enter the construction profession as a productive team member with the potential to become an innovative technical problem-solver and industry leader. The philosophy of the program is to offer a curriculum which emphasizes instruction that challenges, shapes and encourages students to think about and apply their expanding technical knowledge and organizational skills to the solution of contemporary problems. This philosophy is supported by the educational mission of the Institute that emphasizes physics and mathematics, both theoretical and applied, the humanities and social sciences, communication skills, and computer science. Students are prepared through their educational experience to adapt to changes in society, technology and the profession.

 

B.     Goals/Objectives

Institute Goals

In order to fulfill its mission, Wentworth has established the following Student Learning Goals expected of every graduate. These Learning Goals are reinforced in the classroom, laboratory and studio, and in cooperative education experiences and co-curricular opportunities. To this end we expect that all graduates of Wentworth be able to:

  • ·         Locate information and evaluate it critically for its appropriateness and validity
  • ·         Communicate effectively in written, spoken and visual formats
  • ·         Acquire and use analytical tools and skills for evaluating information and solving problems
  • ·         Identify the traits of good leadership
  • ·         Acquire and use the skills needed for effective teamwork
  • ·         Recognize and apply concepts of ethical behavior to personal and public issues
  • ·         Explain the sustainable use of human, physical, and economic resources
  • ·         Recognize and identify historical and contemporary societal and global issues

 

Program Goals

To accomplish the mission of the Construction Management program, the following goals have been developed for the Department in order to prepare students academically for personal and professional success in the built environment:

  • ·         Deliver a construction management education program that is nationally accredited and continuously assessed and improved
  • ·         Provide courses which develop the analytical tools and technical knowledge to evaluate information and solve problems as supervisors and managers in the construction industry
  • ·         Provide courses which develop skills to lead and serve as members of interdisciplinary teams, as well as communicate in written, oral, and visual formats
  • ·         Instill the professional ethical responsibilities of leaders and managers in the construction industry

 

C.     Learning Outcomes

The following learning outcomes are based on the ACCE recommendations and are the basis for the academic curriculum:

  1. 1.      Create written communications appropriate to the construction discipline.
  2. 2.      Create oral presentations appropriate to the construction discipline.
  3. 3.      Create a construction project safety plan.
  4. 4.      Create construction project estimates
  5. 5.      Create construction project schedules.
  6. 6.      Analyze professional decisions based upon ethical principles.
  7. 7.      Analyze construction documents for planning and management of construction processes.
  8. 8.      Analyze methods, materials, and equipment used on construction projects.
  9. 9.      Apply construction management skills as an effective member of a multi-disciplinary team.
  10. 10.  Apply electronic-based technology to manage the construction process.
  11. 11.  Apply basic surveying techniques for construction layout and control.
  12. 12.  Analyze different methods of project delivery and the roles and responsibilities of all constituencies involved in the design and construction process.
  13. 13.  Explain construction risk management.
  14. 14.  Explain construction accounting and cost control.
  15. 15.  Explain construction quality assurance and control.
  16. 16.  Explain construction project control processes.
  17. 17.  Explain the legal implications of contract, common, and regulatory law to manage a construction project.
  18. 18.  Explain the basic principles of sustainable construction.
  19. 19.  Demonstrate the basic principles of structural behavior.
  20. 20.  Demonstrate the basic principles of mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems.

 

The chart on the next page lists each of the Learning Outcomes and indicates in which specific CM course(s) the Learning Outcomes are included and evaluated.

 

 


ACCE LEARNING OBJECTIVES BY CM COURSE

 

ACCE Learning Objectives

CONM 1000 Intro to CM

CONM 1500 Construction Graphics

CONM 1200 Building Construction

CONM 2500 Building Systems

CONM 2000 Construction Surveying

CONM 1600 Heavy Construction Equip.

CONM 2100 Statics + Strength of Matl.

CONM 2200 Estimating

CONM 3000 Material Testing and QC

CONM 2600 Wood and Steel

CONM 3200 Const. Project Scheduling

CONM 3100 Const. Project Management

CONM 3500 Advanced Estimating

CONM 3600 Concrete Analysis + Design

CONM 4000 Construction Proj. Controls

CONM 4100 Const. Bus. + Finance

CONM 4200 Construction Safety

CONM 5500 CM Senior Project

CONM 4600 Construction Law

Comprehensive Final Examination

1. Create Written communications appropriate to the construction discipline.

X

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

X

X

X

X

X

 

2. Create oral presentations appropriate to the construction discipline.

X

 

X

X

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

X

X

 

X

 

 

3. Create a construction project safety plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

X

4. Create construction project costs estimates.

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

5. Create construction project schedules.

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

X

6. Analyze professional decisions based upon ethical principles.

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

 

X

X

X

 

X

X

 

X

X

X

7. Analyze construction documents for planning and management of construction processes.

 

X

 

X

 

 

 

X

X

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

 

X

 

X

8. Analyze methods, materials, and equipment used on construction projects.

 

 

X

X

 

X

 

 

X

X

X

X

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

X

9. Apply construction management skills as an effective member of a multi-disciplinary team.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

 

10. Apply electronic-based technology to manage the construction process.

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

X

X

X

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

11. Apply basic surveying techniques for construction layout and control.

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

12. Analyze methods of project delivery and the roles and responsibilities of all constituencies involved in the design and construction process.

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

13. Explain construction risk management.

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

X

X

 

X

14. Explain construction accounting and cost control.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

X

 

 

 

X

15. Explain construction quality assurance and control.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

16. Explain construction project control processes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

X

 

X

17. Explain the legal implications of contract, common, and regulatory law to manage a construction project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

X

X

X

18. Explain the basic principles of sustainable construction.

X

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

19. Demonstrate the basic principles of structural behavior.

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

X

20. Demonstrate the basic principles of mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems.

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X


D.    Performance Criteria

 

Indirect

  • Pre- and Post-Course Surveys

  • Student and Employer Co-op Surveys

  • Senior Exit Interview and Survey

  • Graduate Survey

  • Alumni Survey

Direct

  • Comprehensive Final Exam

  • Senior Project Industry Panel Evaluation

 

E.     Evaluation Methodology

The following are the assessment tools used by the CM department to evaluate the program.  Results of the tools are analyzed, and all areas of “Concern” or “Weakness” are reviewed by the CM Department.  Specific areas of “Concern” or “Weakness” that appear in multiple assessment tools or over multiple assessment periods are scrutinized and may be the impetus for revisions to a specific course or courses and/or to the curriculum. 

 

Pre- and Post-Course Surveys

Pre- and Post-Course Surveys are conducted for each course.  Questions are derived from the specific course learning objectives.  Each Pre- and Post-Course survey for a given course asks identical questions in order to compare student perceptions of their skills and knowledge at the beginning and end of each course. 

The assessment goal is for at least 70% of the students to “Strongly Agree” or “Agree” that they are able to meet each learning objectives at the end of the course.  If less than 70% of the students respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Concern”.  If less than 60% of the students respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Weakness”.

 

 

Student and Employer Co-op Surveys

Students evaluate their co-op experience via two surveys, one completed at mid-semester and the other at the end of the semester during each of the two required co-op semesters.  The Co-op Office conducts these surveys and subsequently summarizes the data.  The mid-semester survey is used by the co-op office to monitor the co-op experience of each student and to take quick action as problems arise.  The results of the end of semester survey are made available to the department during the next semester at the latest.

The co-op evaluation includes a component called the Employer evaluation of Co-op Student’s Performance which is done at semester’s end by each employer with respect to the individual student employed.  Once again, the Co-op office conducts the survey, summarizes the data and makes it available to the department usually in the following semester.

The summary results of both the end of semester student and co-op employer surveys are shared with the CM faculty.  They provide valuable, detailed feedback from students and industry in four major categories, each with several subcategories:

·         Technical Knowledge Skills

·         Managing Self & Tasks

·         Communicating

·         Creativity and Change

The assessment goal is for at least 70% of the student and employers to respond in the top two categories for each question.  If less than 70% of the students and employers respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Concern”.  If less than 60% of the students and employers respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Weakness”.

 

Senior Exit Interview and Survey

The Department Chair meets in the summer semester prior to graduation with all senior CM students.  The students also complete an anonymous on-line exit survey.  The interview and survey allow the students to express their approval, criticisms, and/or thoughts concerning courses and curriculum and are used to evaluate the CM program on an annual basis.  Results are shared and discussed with faculty during the fall semester.  Changes to courses and curriculum are influenced by the information gathered.

The assessment goal is for at least 70% of the student to respond in the top two categories for each question.  If less than 70% of the students respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Concern”.  If less than 60% of the students respond in these two categories, it is considered an area of “Weakness”.