Arioch Center Photo

Humanities, Social Sciences and Management Department

Patrick F. Hafford, Department Head, 617-989-4870

HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES FACULTY

Professors: Lois J. Ascher
Leon L. Cort, Ph.D.
Amos J. St. Germain, Ph.D.
Michael T. Greene, Ph.D.
Barbara A. Karanian, Ph.D.
George N. Katsiaficas, Ph.D
Jonathan G. Ripley, Ph.D. Marilyn R. Stern
Joanne W. Tuck
Michael W. Carter
Associate Professors:

Russell G. Bramhall, Jr.
Beth Anne Cooke-Cornell
Christopher Gleason, Ph.D.
Cindy P. Stevens, Ph.D.
Elaine Slater

David Downey
Carl E. Petersen
Edward Rooney
Assistant Professors: Ronald Bernier, Ph.D.
Mark John Isola, Ph.D.
Gloria Monaghan

MANAGEMENT SCIENCE FACULTY

Professors: Jack A. Green, J. D.
Patrick Hafford
Hossein Noorian
Associate Professors: ohn M. Cooper, Ed. D.
Joseph Schellings, J. D.
Paul J. Lazarovich
Assistant Professors:

Michael Dunlop, Ed. D.

 

ACADEMIC DAY PROGRAMS
Bachelor of Science in Management
Professional Certificate in Communications

DEPARTMENTAL PHILOSOPHY
The Department of Humanities, Social Sciences, and Management (HSSM) believes that it plays a critical role in the education of the Wentworth student. Our students are engaged in their major fields of study in disciplines whose goal is to utilize design, engineering, and technology to make life “better.” The purpose of Humanities and Social Sciences is to help students define “better.” Further, no academic discipline of the human experience exists independent of that human experience. Therefore, Wentworth students must acquire a set of values which helps them to understand and exercise integrity, vision, community involvement, and knowledge of self. As a part of this values set, students must understand the application of their discipline to contemporary issues, they must acquire strong communication and team-building skills, and they must understand the definition of “leadership.” Most importantly, they must understand themselves and their personal responsibility; i.e., develop a sense of professionalism.

The Humanities, Social Sciences, and Management curriculum offers an opportunity for students to explore and master critical thinking skills, an essential for flexibility and the basis for lifelong learning. Innovative problem-solving skills grow when students are provided with a wide variety of learning opportunities and challenges, such as are offered by our department. The technical purpose of the writing/communications component at Wentworth is to instill in our students those skills necessary for them to communicate, both orally and in writing, in their classes, in the work place, and in their community.

The technical purpose of the Sophomore Social Sciences is to introduce students to the concepts of community, society, and self. The role of the Upper Level Humanities and Social Sciences courses in the Wentworth curriculum reflects our belief that all students must understand the application of their discipline to contemporary issues, acquire a sense of professional and personal ethics, and be sensitive to the human condition.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Students must successfully complete an English Sequence as determined by the English Placement Test results. The English Sequences based on placement, for the day programs, are:

  • ENGL100 and ENGL115
  • ENGL020, ENGL100, and ENGL115
  • ENGL013, ENGL017, and ENGL100
  • ENGL125 and ENGL135

Students who are in a three-course English sequence may either take English II during the summer between their freshman and sophomore years, take two sophomore social sciences during the second semester of their sophomore year, or take one sophomore social science during the summer between their sophomore and junior years so that all students are in exactly the same place at the start of their junior year.

Six (6) semester credit hours (two three-credit courses) of Social Sciences (100-level) are required of all Day students and are prerequisite to all upper-level Humanities and Social Sciences electives. Each semester, Wentworth offers a number of sophomore social sciences from among which students may choose.
These include:

  • COMM290 Social Perspectives of Journalism (PCC course)
  • COMM330 Introduction to Mass Communications (PCC course)
  • ECON110 Economics (required for BCMT and BMET), excluded for BSM
  • HIST125 Ancient World Civilization
  • HIST126 Modern World Civilizations
  • HIST130 U.S. History to 1877
  • HIST265 Modern U.S. History
  • HIST365 Approaches to Western Art: Caves to Cathedrals
  • POLS120 Political Science
  • POLS150 Introduction to American Government
  • PSYC110 Psychology
  • SOCL105 Sociology

A sophomore social science is an introductory course designed to survey the scope of a field. Students may also cross-register for their sophomore social sciences through the Colleges of the Fenway (COF). Permission of the HSSM department head is required. When searching for a sophomore social science in the Colleges of the Fenway, students should choose a three- or four-credit (most COF courses are four-credits, regardless of level), 100-level course in one of the above-listed subjects or choose from the list of acceptable COF courses available in the HSSM Department Office.

The policy for The Arioch Center requires a minimum of six semester credit hours of English and three semester hours of Humanities or Social Sciences (100-level) for all The Arioch Center Associate Degree graduates. Refer to Page 265 for complete requirements.

All Day baccalaureate degree graduates must successfully complete at least twelve (12) semester credit hours (three four-credit courses) of upper-level Humanities and Social Sciences (380-level or higher) beyond those required in the sophomore year. Several programs require additional upper-level Humanities or Social Science courses or electives; students should review their degree audits carefully with their advisors to determine the number of courses required for graduation. An upper-level HUSS elective examines one area of the humanities and social sciences in depth. Therefore, while the sophomore social science, psychology, surveys the areas of study and the important ideas of the field of psychology, the upper-level course, Abnormal Psychology (PSYC410) examines a specific area of psychology in depth. Upper-level Humanities and Social Sciences are offered in the fields of Economics, History, Humanities, Literature, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology.

The department believes there should be a balance in a student’s program. Therefore, each day student is required to take at least four (4) credit hours in the Literature/Humanities area and four (4) credit hours in the Social Sciences. The other four credit hours may be taken in either category of courses. However, the entire 12 hours may not be taken exclusively in Literature/Humanities or exclusively in the Social Sciences. Refer to Page 265 for complete requirements. History courses may be counted in either the literature/humanities or the social sciences category. The literature/humanities courses have the prefixes HIST, HUMN, LITR, or PHIL. The Social Sciences have the prefixes ECON, HIST, POLS, PSYC, and SOCL.

All Arioch Center baccalaureate degree graduates must take a minimum of nine semester credit hours in the Humanities and Social Sciences (350-level or above) beyond the nine required for the associate degree. The Division believes there should be a balance in the student’s program. Therefore, the student should take at least three credit hours in literature and humanities, and three credit hours in the social sciences. The remaining three credit hours may taken in either category of courses. The entire nine hours may not be taken exclusively in literature/humanities or exclusively in the social sciences. Refer to Page 265 for complete requirements.

Students may cross-register for their upper-level humanities and social sciences electives through the Colleges of the Fenway, but may not take them at another college or university, in accordance with Wentworth’s policy that all third-, fourth- and fifth-year courses must be taken at Wentworth. Permission of the HSSM department head is required for cross-registration. General guidelines for selecting an upper-level elective at the Colleges of the Fenway are available in the HSSM Department Office.

Students must successfully complete a minimum of one communication course as specified on each student’s Degree Audit. The ability to write well specifically for the technical disciplines/professions is critical, and Wentworth is committed to preparing students for those responsibilities in both the classroom and in the work place.

However, Communications courses (COMM) are technical courses in all curricula and do not fulfill the Humanities/Social Science requirement with the exception of the Professional Certificate in Communication (PCC) courses:

  • COMM290: Social Perspectives of Journalism (Day Sophomore Social Science)
  • COMM330: Introduction to Mass Communications (Day Sophomore Social Science)
  • COMM580: Society and Visual Media (Day upper level SOCL SCI)
  • COMM610: Public Relations (Day upper level SOCL SCI)

These courses are acceptable as social sciences because they contain significant social content. Students who elect to complete the Professional Communication Certificate may use COMM580 and COMM610 as their upper level social sciences; HOWEVER, they must then select an upper level Humanities/Literature course to complete their HUSS requirement.

All Wentworth Day students must take and pass the Sophomore Writing Proficiency Assessment exam. Students should register for ENGL350 (the test registration code) in the second semester of their sophomore year (only if they have completed their English sequence). All sophomores, including transfers, must register for this exam. In addition, any transfer student entering Wentworth as a junior and taking English at Wentworth must take the assessment exam.

In the HSSM Department office, a list is available of some of the day Upper-Level HUSS Electives which are offered on a regular basis with their designation as fulfills the HUMN/LIT requirement or fulfills the SOCIAL SCIENCE requirement.

Baccalaureate International English Sequence
Students who are admitted to a baccalaureate program and who, based on their TOEFL & TWE or the Institute Placement Test, must complete the International English Sequence, must take, at a minimum, ENGL013, ENGL017, and ENGL100. Toward the end of the first semester, all students in the International English sequence will be required to take and pass a proficiency exam in reading, writing, and speaking. Any student who does not pass the proficiency exam, or who does not make satisfactory progress in ENGL013, may be required to take additional English Language courses. A baccalaureate student who must take one of these courses may use that course to fulfill a general elective requirement.

Policies
Advanced standing may be granted for equivalent college courses taken prior to admission at an accredited college or university (Refer to Page 300 of this catalogue for specific requirements). Substitute courses taken at other institutions after admission must be approved in advance by the Department of Humanities, Social Sciences, and Management and must be taken at an accredited college or university. Refer to Page 261 of this catalogue for specific requirements.

Management (BSM) Leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree

Students enrolled in the Management (BSM) program are exposed to the functional areas of management and may acquire the various managerial and analytical skills necessary to successfully administer human, natural, and technological resources within an organization. A concentrated study in financial analysis, marketing principles, operations management, contemporary manufacturing, strategic management, the global economy, organizational behavior, information systems, and the legal aspects of business is introduced in this program. Management (BSM) students have the opportunity to select a four course concentration in Technology Management, Communication or Project Leadership, as listed on to page 112-113. Students are required to satisfactorily complete two cooperative work semesters as described in the curriculum.
The discipline of management requires of practitioners both technical knowledge and the skill to communicate. From the first year through the senior year, BSM students are required to compile an Electronic Career Portfolio (ECP) of their work in consultation with their academic advisor and concentration track advisor. The ECP Requirement Guidelines are available in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Management Department office. In the spring semester of the senior year, seniors register for their final graded portfolio assessment.

Graduates of the Management (BSM) program may seek entry-level management positions in project management, operations, sales, production management, marketing management, or new product development. They may also pursue positions as field service engineers, product support specialists, MIS specialists, or quality assurance analysts. It is possible for students to pursue graduate degrees in business, law, public administration, and technical related fields. The Management (BSM) program is accredited by the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education. (See www.iacbe.org for information about IACBE accreditation.)

Program Mission
The Bachelor of Science in Management (BSM) degree is designed to help students become leaders by acquiring knowledge and competencies in both management and technology. With a strong professional foundation in domestic and international management, policy, and practice, the BSM program strives to prepare diverse students for positions of leadership in the private and public sector. Graduates are prepared to create, refine and sustain an organization’s competitive advantage by developing processes, managing technological resources and leading its people. The BSM program promotes and assesses an evolving scholarly environment in conjunction with academic and industry leaders. Students are also prepared to pursue graduate studies and lifelong learning. Note: Qualified students from other majors may transfer into this program with the approval of the Department Head. Refer to page 261 for details or contact the Department.


Management (BSM)

Leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree

Students enrolled in the Management (BSM) program are exposed to the functional areas of management and may acquire the various managerial and analytical skills necessary to successfully administer human, natural, and technological resources within an organization. A concentrated study in financial analysis, marketing principles, operations management, contemporary manufacturing, strategic management, the global economy, organizational behavior, information systems, and the legal aspects of business is introduced in this program. Management (BSM) students have the opportunity to select a four course concentration in Technology Management, Communication or Project Leadership, as listed on to page 112-113. Students are required to satisfactorily complete two cooperative work semesters as described in the curriculum.

The discipline of management requires of practitioners both technical knowledge and the skill to communicate. From the first year through the senior year, BSM students are required to compile an Electronic Career Portfolio (ECP) of their work in consultation with their academic advisor and concentration track advisor. The ECP Requirement Guidelines are available in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Management Department office. In the spring semester of the senior year, seniors register for their final graded portfolio assessment.

Graduates of the Management (BSM) program may seek entry-level management positions in project management, operations, sales, production management, marketing management, or new product development. They may also pursue positions as field service engineers, product support specialists, MIS specialists, or quality assurance analysts. It is possible for students to pursue graduate degrees in business, law, public administration, and technical related fields. The Management (BSM) program is accredited by the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education. (See www.iacbe.org for information about IACBE accreditation.)

Program Mission
The Bachelor of Science in Management (BSM) degree is designed to help students become leaders by acquiring knowledge and competencies in both management and technology. With a strong professional foundation in domestic and international management, policy, and practice, the BSM program strives to prepare diverse students for positions of leadership in the private and public sector. Graduates are prepared to create, refine and sustain an organization’s competitive advantage by developing processes, managing technological resources and leading its people. The BSM program promotes and assesses an evolving scholarly environment in conjunction with academic and industry leaders. Students are also prepared to pursue graduate studies and lifelong learning. Note: Qualified students from other majors may transfer into this program with the approval of the Department Head. Refer to page 261 for details or contact the Department.

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