Arioch Center Photo

Department of Electronics and Mechanical

Frederick F. Driscoll, Interim Department Head, 617-989-4225
Sandeep Dilwali, Associate Department Head, 617-989-4140
Michael E. Jackson, Assistant Department Head, 617-989-4215
Shankar Krishnan, Director of Biomedical Engineering, 617-989-4266

ELECTRONICS FACULTY

Professors: Frederick F. Driscoll
Shankar Krishnan
Frank S. Spada
Associate Professors: Scott Grenquist
Timothy M. Johnson
Ali Khabari
L. Georges Chedid
Siben Dasgupta
Joseph F. Santacroce
Assistant Professors:

Salah Badjou
David Birkett
Angel DeCegama

Sandeep Dilwali
Douglas Dow
Lili Ma

MECHANICAL FACULTY

Professors: Masoud Olia Mansour Zenouzi
Ali R. Moazed
Associate Professors: Harry Avakian
Anthony W. Duva
Michael E. Jackson
Richard L. Roberts
Peter S. Rourke
Bo Tao
Theodore Greene
Assistant Professors:

Frank Caserta, Jr.
Robert Lind
Ilie Talpasanu

Xiaobin Le
Gloria Ma

MISSION STATEMENT
The Department of Electronics and Mechanical offers degree programs in engineering and technology which are rooted in Wentworth's rich tradition of project-based, experiential learning. The department strives to prepare its graduates for productive and challenging careers in private practice, industry, and government, and its programs provide a solid foundation for lifelong professional development. The curricula are comprehensive, rigorous, and well-balanced in the presentation of theory and problem- solving techniques. The primary objectives of the department's baccalaureate programs are to furnish students with the analytical and technical skills required for successful professional practice in their respective technical disciplines, to cultivate students' abilities to readily adapt to workplace changes, communicate proficiently, and to work effectively in a team environment.

The departmental faculty and staff also share a commitment to support student interest and pursuit of graduate study and professional certifications, as well as to encourage students to consider careers involving the design and manufacture of products. The high level of student and faculty participation in professional societies and club activities including: the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Society of Automotive Engineers, the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, National Alternative Training Consortium, National Center for Telecommunications Technologies, and the Society of Women Engineers have furnished significant external affiliations and sponsorships of special projects.

ACADEMIC DAY PROGRAMS
Bachelor of Science - Computer Engineering Technology
Bachelor of Science - Electromechanical Engineering
Bachelor of Science - Electronic Engineering Technology
Bachelor of Science - Mechanical Engineering Technology

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
Technical Operations - Collegiate Training Initiative (AT-CTI)

Wentworth Institute of Technology is an approved participant in the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Technical Operations-Collegiate Training Initiative (AT-CTI) program. Certified degree programs include the Bachelor of Science in Electronic Engineering Technology and Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering Technology.


Computer Engineering Technology (BCOT)

Leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree

The Computer Engineering Technology (BCOT) program introduces students to both the hardware and software aspects of computers with emphasis on computer-related devices and systems. Students gain experience in both interfacing a computer for control applications and data communication, using a full range of equipment. The hardware courses cover basic digital electronics to computer architecture, and include operating and learning microprocessors, microcontrollers and microcomputers. The software courses begin with introductory computer science and advance to programming applications and operating systems. Other hardware courses include basic circuit theory, electronic devices, integrated circuits and applications, and data communications. During their course of studies students spend a minimum of two cooperative semesters in industry. Graduates, in addition to continuing their education at the graduate level, may seek employment in the design application, manufacturing, and testing of computer or computer-controlled equipment.

Computer Engineering Technology Program (BCOT) Mission Statement

As an extension of the Institute's philosophy, the program's mission is to admit qualified high school graduates and prepare them for a productive professional career in Computer Engineering Technology. To fulfill this goal, the program offers students a mathematically-based engineering technology education that provides the technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, and hands-on experience needed for them to grow as intellectually inquisitive individuals and critically involved members of our society with a lifelong commitment to continued learning.

The Computer Engineering Technology baccalaureate (BCOT) degree program is a comprehensive four year program of study that is rooted in Wentworth's rich tradition of project based and experiential learning. The curriculum is rigorous and well balanced in the presentation of theory and problem solving techniques. The primary objective of coursework is to furnish students with the analytical and technical skills required for successful professional practice in the computer hardware related industries. The Computer Engineering Technology program also strives to provide its graduates with a solid foundation for lifelong professional development, to cultivate students' abilities to readily adapt to workplace changes, to communicate proficiently, and to work effectively in team environment.

The Institute firmly believes that the faculty is at the core of the educational quality of its degree programs. The wealth of experience available through the diverse professional background of the faculty is a key element in attracting highly qualified students as well as supporting the educational pursuits of the undergraduates enrolled in the Computer Engineering Technology program.

Computer Engineering Technology (BCOT) Program Objectives

  • To develop students' competencies for successful long term professional practice in the Computer Engineering Technology disciplines
  • To promote creativity and encourage innovative approaches to the design and operation of microcomputer architecture and networked systems
  • To provide the students with the necessary background to develop state of the art computer hardware, interfacing devices, and integrated hardware/ software systems
  • To support student interest in follow-up graduate study
  • To encourage students to participate in computer engineering related professional societies and student club activities such as the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), Association for Computing Machinery ( ACM), Society of Women Engineers (SWE), and Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME)
  • To provide students with analytical and technical skills to test and optimize the performance of data communication and networking systems
  • To assist the students in gaining an understanding of societal issues, cultural diversity, and different points of view

Computer Engineering Technology (BCOT)

FRESHMAN YEAR

Fall Semester

R

L

C

ELEC101 Intro. to Engineering and Technology 2 4 4
ELEC105 Circuit Theory I 3 2 4
ENGL100 English I 4 0 4
MATH205 College Mathematics I 3 2 4
Total

12

8

16

Spring Semester

COMP120 Computer Science I Using C 3 2 4
ELEC163 Electronic Design I 1 4 3
ELEC195 Circuit Theory II 3 2 4
ENGL115 English II 3 0 3
MATH250 Precalculus 3 2 4
Total

13

10

18

SOPHOMORE YEAR

Fall Semester

R

L

C

ELEC206 Semiconductor Devices 3 2 4
ELEC236 Logic Circuits 3 2 4
ELECTIVE Social Science Elective 3 0 3
MATH280 Calculus I 4 0 4
PHYS210 College Physics I 3 2 4
Total
16

6

19

Spring Semester

R

L

C

ELEC296 Digital Applications 3 2 4
ELEC306 Integrated Circuits with Applications 3 2 4
ELECTIVE Social Science Elective 3 0 3
ENGL350 Writing Competency Assessment - - 0
MATH290 Calculus II 4 0 4
PHYS220 College Physics II 3 2 4
Total
16

6

19

Note: Prior to entering junior year courses, students must have completed all prerequisite courses above or have received permission from the department to enroll in upper-level courses.

Summer Semester

Credits

COOP300

Optional Cooperative Education

0

JUNIOR YEAR

Fall Semester

R

L

C

COMM400 Technical Communications 2 2 3
ELEC415 Object Oriented Programming for Electronics 3 2 4
ELEC426 Data Communications 3 2 4
ELECTIVE Technical Elective1 - - 3
MATH510 Calculus III 4 0 4
Total

-

-

18

Spring Semester

   

Credits

COOP400

Cooperative Education I

0

Summer Semester

R L C
ELEC345 Microcontrollers and Embedded Computer Systems 3 2 4
ELEC486 Computer Systems Architecture 3 2 4
ELEC505 Linear Network Analysis 3 2 4
ELEC516 Computer Communication and Networks 3 2 4
 
Total

12

8

16

SENIOR YEAR

Fall Semester

      Credits
COOP600 Cooperative Education II   0

Spring Semester

R

L

C

COMP605 Introduction to Operating Systems 2 2 3
ELEC595 Digital Control Systems 3 2 4
ELEC596 Introduction to Digital Signal Processing 3 2 4
ELECTIVE Humanities or Social Science Elective 4 0 4
ELECTIVE Humanities or Social Science Elective 4 0 4    
Total

16

6

19

Summer Semester

R

L

C

ELEC667 Advanced Programmable Logic 2 2 3
ELEC675 Digital Communication Systems 3 2 4
ELEC685 Senior Design Project 1 6 4
ELECTIVE Humanities or Social Science Elective 4 0 4
 
Total

10

10

15

1Courses selected with the Faculty Advisor as necessary to complement and to broaden the student's background.

R=Class Hours Per Week, L=Lab Hours Per Week, C=Semester Credit Hours


Electronic Engineering Technology(BEET)

Leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree

students entering the Electronic Engineering Technology (BEET) program develop a thorough foundation in circuit analysis and solid-state principles. The program is design-oriented and students are encouraged to probe deeply into the areas they find to be of special interest to them. Approximately 40 percent of the program is devoted to computer-integrated laboratory work. This provides the student with essential “hands-on” familiarity with electronic circuits, components, and systems, including data acquisition and process control, and related software programs. Technical competence is established in the use of modern laboratory instruments, stressing experimental procedures and techniques. Electronic Engineering Technology (BEET) is a cooperative education program which provides students with the opportunity to take part in a paid work experience in industry for a minimum of two non-consecutive semesters. Graduates, in addition to continuing their education at the graduate level, may seek design and manufacturing positions as engineering technologists where an applications oriented background is necessary.

Electronic Engineering Technology Program (BEET) Mission Statement

As an extension of the Institute's philosophy, the program's mission is to admit qualified high school graduates and prepare them for a productive professional career in Electronic Engineering Technology. To fulfill this goal, the program offers students a mathematically-based engineering technology education that provides the technical knowledge, problem-solving skills and hands-on experience needed for them to grow as intellectually inquisitive individuals and critically involved members of our society with a lifelong commitment to continued learning.

The Electronic Engineering Technology baccalaureate (BEET) degree program is a comprehensive four year program of study that is rooted in Wentworth's rich tradition of project based and experiential learning. The curriculum is rigorous and well balanced in the presentation of theory and problem solving techniques. The primary objective of coursework is to furnish students with the analytical and technical skills required for successful professional practice in the various electronics related industries. The Electronics program also strives to provide its graduates with a solid foundation for lifelong professional development, to cultivate students' abilities to readily adapt to workplace changes, to communicate proficiently, and to work effectively in team environment.
The Institute firmly believes that the faculty is at the core of the educational quality of its degree programs. The wealth of experience available through the diverse professional background of the faculty is a key element in attracting highly qualified students as well as supporting the educational pursuits of the undergraduates enrolled in the Electronics program.

Electronic Engineering Technology Program Objectives

  • To develop students' competencies for successful long term professional practice in the Electronics disciplines
  • To promote creativity and encourage innovative approaches to the electronics systems operations and design
  • To provide the students with the necessary background to develop state of the art electronic devices
  • To support student interest in follow up graduate study
  • To encourage students to participate in electronic related professional societies and student club activities such as IEEE, ISA, SWE and SME
  • To provide students with analytical and technical skills to test and optimize the performance of feedback control systems
  • To assist the students in gaining an understanding of societal issues, cultural diversity, and different points of view

Electronic Engineering Technology (BEET)

FRESHMAN YEAR

Fall Semester

R

L

C

ELEC101 Intro. to Engineering and Technology 2 4 4
ELEC105 Circuit Theory I 3 2 4
ENGL100 English I 4 0 4
MATH205 College Mathematics I 3 2 4
Total

12

8

16

Spring Semester

COMP120 Computer Science I Using C 3 2 4
ELEC163 Electronic Design I 1 4 3
ELEC195 Circuit Theory II 3 2 4
ENGL115 English II 3 0 3
MATH250 Precalculus 3 2 4
Total

13

10

18

SOPHOMORE YEAR

Fall Semester

R

L

C

ELEC206 Semiconductor Devices 3 2 4
ELEC236 Logic Circuits 3 2 4
ELECTIVE Social Science Elective 3 0 3
MATH280 Calculus I 4 0 4
PHYS210 College Physics I 3 2 4
Total
16

6

19

Spring Semester

R

L

C

ELEC306 Integrated Circuits with Applications 3 2 4
ELECTIVE Social Science Elective 3 0 3
ENGL350 Writing Competency Assessment - - 0
MATH290 Calculus II 4 0 4
PHYS220 College Physics II 3 2 4
Total
16

6

19

Note: Prior to entering junior year courses, students must have completed all prerequisite courses above or have received permission from the department to enroll in upper-level courses.

Summer Semester

Credits

COOP300

Optional Cooperative Education

0

JUNIOR YEAR

Fall Semester

R

L

C

COMM400 Technical Communications 2 2 3
ELEC415 Object Oriented Programming for Electronics 3 2 4
ELEC467 Electric Machines and Transformers 3 2 4
ELECTIVE Technical Elective1 - - 3
MATH510 Calculus III 4 0 4
Total

-

-

18

Spring Semester

   

Credits

COOP400

Cooperative Education I

0

Summer Semester

Credits
ELEC345 Microcontrollers and Embedded Computer Systems 3 2 4
ELEC496 Advanced Sensors and Interfacing Systems 3 2 4
ELEC505 Linear Network Analysis 3 2 4
ELEC510 Discrete Signals and Systems 3 2 4
  12 8 16
SENIOR YEAR

Fall Semester

 

    Credits
COOP600 Cooperative Education II   0

Spring Semester

R

L

C

ELEC575 Digital Signal Processing 3 2 4
ELEC585 Electromagnetics 3 2 4
ELEC605 Senior Design Project I 1 4 3
ELECTIVE Humanities or Social Science Elective 4 0 4
ELECTIVE Humanities or Social Science Elective 4 0 4
Total

15

8

19

Summer Semester

R

L

C

ELEC625 Feedback Control Systems 3 2 4
ELEC675 Digital Communication Systems 3 2 4
ELEC695 Senior Design Project II 1 4 3
ELECTIVE Humanities or Social Science Elective 4 0 4
 
Total
11 8 15

1Courses selected with the Faculty Advisor as necessary to complement and to broaden the student's background.

R=Class Hours Per Week, L=Lab Hours Per Week, C=Semester Credit Hours


Mechanical Engineering Technology (BMET)

Leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree

This program provides students with a fundamental background in basic mathematics, physics, and related technical sciences and specialty areas such as strength of materials, mechanical graphics, mechanical design, CAD, thermal sciences, electricity and electronics, and fluid mechanics. The cornerstone of a Wentworth education is hands-on experience, which means BMET students spend a great deal of time actively participating in laboratory activities. Classroom study of engineering technology fundamentals is balanced with appropriate laboratory experience emphasizing both oral and written communication skills. The first two semesters of this program are offered in two different sequences to ensure adequate laboratory time and the remaining semesters are in unison. The Mechanical Engineering Technology Baccalaureate program (BMET) is a cooperative education program in which all students spend at least two semesters in industry, alternating with their last four semesters in classes on campus. Graduates may continue their studies at the graduate level or pursue and industrial career. Wentworth BMET graduates are practical engineers, with expertise in the application of mechanical engineering technology, and as such, are in high demand and well prepared to meet the professional challenges of a constantly changing and increasingly global workforce.

Mechanical Engineering Technology Mission
As an extension of the Institute's philosophy, the program's mission is to admit qualified high school graduates and prepare them for a productive professional career in Mechanical Engineering Technology. To fulfill this goal, the program offers students a mathematically-based engineering technology education that provides the technical knowledge and problem-solving skills needed for them to grow as intellectually inquisitive individuals and critically involved members of our society with a lifelong commitment to continued learning. We provide our graduates with hands-on experience in the following technical expertise areas through technical laboratory practice.

  • Mechanical Design
  • Fluid Mechanics
  • Computer Aided Design
  • Thermal Sciences
  • Material Science
  • Strength of Materials
  • Manufacturing Processes

Mechanical Engineering Technology Objectives
The long term objectives of the program are to ensure graduates succeed in their chosen field by:

  • Providing the foundation of technical skills necessary for career advancement in the field of Mechanical Engineering Technology
  • Ensure graduates understand the value of lifelong learning by continuing to learn and educate themselves
  • Imparting the skills necessary to apply mechanical design fundamentals to analyze problems and provide reasonable solutions

Mechanical Engineering Technology Program Outcomes

  • To understand and implement the fundamentals of the Mechanical Design Process
  • To have the ability to work effectively on a design team
  • To have depth in experience and understanding in the development of detailed engineering drawings through computer Aided Design
  • To be able to apply their practical education, analytical reasoning, and creative skills toward the resolution of issues that our scientific, technological, and social
  • To be able to incorporate professional standards and ethics into their engineering technology application projects
  • To be proficient in both oral and written communication skills as applied to both technical and social endeavors

Mechanical Engineering Technology (BMET)

FRESHMAN YEAR

Fall Semester

R

L

C

COMP114 Structured Programming for Engineering and Technology 2 2 3
ENGL100 English I 4 0 4
MATH205 College Mathematics I 3 2 4
MECH103 Introduction to Engineering and Technology 2 2 3
MECH124 Mechanical Graphics (A-track) 2 4 4
or      
MANF195 Manufacturing Processes(B-track) 2 4 4
Total

13

10

18

Spring Semester

ENGL115 English II 3 0 3
MATH250 Precalculus 3 2 4
PHYS210 College Physics I 3 2 4
MECH163 Mechanical Design I 1 4 3
MANF195 Manufacturing Processes (A-track) 2 4 4
or
MECH124 Mechanical Graphics (B-track) 2 4 4
Total

12

12

18

SOPHOMORE YEAR

Fall Semester

R

L

C

ECON110 Economics 3 0 3
MATH280 Calculus I 4 0 4
PHSY220 College Physics II 3 2 4
MECH343 Statics 3 2 4
MECH395 Mechanical CAD Applications I 2 4 4
PHYS220 College Physics II 3 2 4
Total
15

8

19

Spring Semester

R

L

C

SS ELECTIVE Sophomore Social Science Elective 3 0 3
MECH255 Thermodynamics I 3 2 4
ENGL350 Writing Competency Assessment - - -
MATH290 Calculus II 4 0 4
MECH180 Strength of Materials 3 2 4
CHEM360 Chemistry I 3 2 4
Total
-

-

19

Note: Prior to entering junior year courses, students must have completed all prerequisite courses above or have received permission from the department to enroll in upper-level courses.

Summer Semester

Credits

COOP300

Optional Cooperative Education

0

JUNIOR YEAR

Fall Semester

R

L

C

COMM400 Technical Communications 2 2 3
ELECTIVE Mechanical Elective I1 - - 3
ELECTIVE Humanities or Social Science 4 0 4
MATH510 Calculus III 4 0 4
MECH270 Fluid Mechanics 3 2 4
Total

-

-

18

Spring Semester

   

Credits

COOP400

Cooperative Education

0

    R L C

Summer Semester

 
ELEC130 Electricity and Electronics 3 2 4
MATH620 Applied Differential Equations I 4 0 4
ELECTIVE Mechanical Elective II1 - - 3
MECH530 Material Science 2 2 3

Total

-

-

14

SENIOR YEAR

Fall Semester

 

    Credits
COOP600 Cooperative Education II   0

Spring Semester

R

L

C

ELECTIVE Humanities or Social Science Elective 4 0 4
ELECTIVE Humanities or Social Science Elective 4 0 4
ELECTIVE Mechanical Elective III1 - - 3
MECH460 Heat Transfer 4 0 4
MECH591 Instrumentation and Measurement 1 4 3
Total

-

-

18

Summer Semester

R

L

C

ELECTIVE Humanities or Social Science Elective 3 2 4
ELECTIVE Mechanical Elective IV1 - - 3
MECH605 Mechanical CAD Applications II 2 4 4
MECH690 Mechanical Design Project 1 6 4
 
Total
- - 15
      
       R=Class Hours Per Week, L=Lab Hours Per Week, C=Semester Credit Hours

1A total of 12 semester credit hours of mechanical electives must be taken as a part of this program. After consultation with their faculty advisor, students should select and successfully complete courses to support their desired area of specialization from the elective offerings I, II, III, and IV, listed below: Elective areas include the field of Machine Design, Thermo-Fluids Design and Manufacturing (Students are prepared to take the Fundamentals of Manufacturing Exam through the Society of Manufacturing). Additional courses approved by the advisor or department head will also satisfy the elective requirements.

Elective I: MECH315 Kinematics or MECH290 Thermodynamics II or MANF305 Computer Aided Manufacturing

Elective II: MECH375 Machine Design I or MECH380 Introduction to HVAC Systems or Other Elective Approved by Advisor and
Department Head

Elective III: MECH578 Special Topics or MECH562 Fluid Mechanics II or MANF260 Quality Control

Elective IV: MECH 468 Machine Design II or MECH485 Automatic Control Systems or MECH540 Energy Analysis and Cogeneration
for Building Facilities or MANF500 Applied Robotics

Elective numbers indicate normal semester offerings however, courses may also be offered at times in addition to normal offerings.


Electromechanical Engineering (BELM)

Leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree

The Electromechanical Engineering (BELM) program is a five-year engineering program with a dynamic interdisciplinary character and unique approach to learning. Grounded in a solid foundation of mathematics, science, and the humanities and social sciences, this program incorporates all the essential elements of an electrical and mechanical engineering curriculum. This program features engineering design courses throughout its five-year study, extensive use of computers to solve engineering problems, and a faculty committee management structure that responds quickly to industrial changes and the academic needs of students. Wentworth stresses the importance of hands-on experience, which means BELM students spend a great deal of time working in our state-of-the-art laboratories. Computers and microprocessors are a large part of the program; students use computers and test equipment extensively to verify and develop principles of engineering in diverse areas such as mechanics of materials, embedded microcontroller systems, analog and digital circuit design, thermodynamics, vibrations, materials science, feedback controls, and machine design.

Biomedical Systems Engineering Option
Students enrolled in the Electromechanical Engineering (BELM) program may choose the option of developing a concentration in Biomedical Systems Engineering, as shown below.

Career Opportunities
Electromechanical Engineering (BELM) is a cooperative education program which provides students with one of the most important aspects of a Wentworth education. BELM students will complete at least two non-consecutive semesters of paid full-time cooperative work experience in industry in fields related to electromechanical engineering. This experience gives Wentworth students an advantage over their peers at graduation. Graduates may continue their studies at the graduate level or pursue an industrial career. Wentworth BELM graduates are multidisciplinary engineers, with expertise in electrical and mechanical engineering, and as such, are in high demand and well prepared to meet the professional challenges of a constantly changing and increasingly global work force. Students who choose the Biomedical Systems Engineering concentration further expand their career opportunities.

Frederick F. Driscoll, Program Chair, 617-989-4135

PROGRAM COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Harry Avakian
Salah Badjou
L. Georges Chedid
Siben Dasgupta
Frederick F. Driscoll
Barbara Karanian
Masoud Olia
Mansour Zenouzi

     
Electromechanical Engineering Program Mission Statement

The mission of this interdisciplinary electrical and mechanical program is to prepare students to become practicing engineers who will become innovative problem solvers in industry, government, and academia.

Program Objectives

To achieve this goal, our graduates will:

  • Have the technical proficiency in both electrical and mechanical engineering to solve multidisciplinary problems that involve system-level analysis, modeling, and design
  • Work effectively as members of multidisciplinary teams that analyze data critically, synthesize information, and implement ethical solutions for the betterment of society
  • Possess communication skills necessary to present technical information professionally to various audiences
  • Have the educational background and desire to pursue both directed and independent study that will advance them personally and professionally

The Electromechanical Engineering program at Wentworth is committed to both a collaborative teaching model and a committee management structure thereby providing the students access to many innovative interdisciplinary educational opportunities.

ELECTROMECHANICAL ENGINEERING (BELM) GUIDELINES FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS

As a general rule, the BELM Program Committee will use the following guidelines to evaluate potential students who wish to transfer course work from a program at Wentworth or from an accredited program (NEASC and/or TAC-ABET or EAC-ABET accreditation or equivalent) at another college or university to the Electromechanical Engineering program.

General Admission Requirements for Transfer to the BELM Program
Applicants for transfer admission to the Electromechanical Engineering (BELM) program must have (1) satisfactorily completed similar course work at an accredited (NEASC and/or TAC-ABET or EAC-ABET accreditation or equivalent) college or university and (2) have a minimum of 2.5 out of a 4.0 grade point average for all mathematics and physics courses.

Specific Transfer Policies
Computer Science: A grade of “C” (2.00) or better can be accepted as transfer credit into the BELM program for substantially similar course work done in either a program at Wentworth or from an accredited (NEASC and/or TAC-ABET or EACABET accreditation or equivalent) program at another college or university e.g., COMP120 Computer Science I Using C. Please note that only a Language C or C++ programming course is acceptable for transfer credit into the BELM program.

Engineering Physics and Chemistry: A grade of “C” (2.00) or better can be accepted as transfer credit into the BELM program for substantially similar course work done in either a program at Wentworth or from an accredited (NEASC and/ or TAC-ABET or EAC-ABET accreditation or equivalent) program at another college or university e.g., PHYS310. Please note the algebra-based Technical or College Physics courses offered at Wentworth are not appropriate substitutes for the calculus-based Engineering Physics courses in the BELM program.

General Electives: General elective courses are selected after consultation with faculty advisors as necessary to complement and to broaden the student's background.

Humanities and Social Sciences: Humanities and Social Science transfer credit must follow the guidelines established by that department.

Mathematics: A grade of “C” (2.00) or better can be accepted as transfer credit into the BELM program for substantially similar course work done in either a program at Wentworth or from an accredited (NEASC and/or TAC-ABET or EACABET accreditation or equivalent) program at another college or university e.g., MATH265 Engineering Mathematics, MATH280 Calculus I, MATH290 Calculus II, MATH510 Calculus III, MATH620 Applied Differential Equations I, MATH890 Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory, and MATH505 Probability and Statistics for Engineers.

Skills Courses: A grade of “C” (2.00) or better can be accepted as transfer credit into the BELM program for substantially similar course work done in either a program at Wentworth or from an accredited (NEASC and/or TAC-ABET or EACABET accreditation or equivalent) program at another college or university e.g., ENGR100 Introduction to Engineering.

Technical Courses: The distinction as to program type—technology vs. engineering - is very important and must be adhered to when considering transfer credit for technical courses. No technical course taken as part of any technology program can be accepted as transfer credit for any engineering course in the BELM program. However, technical courses with comparable course work, taken as part of an engineering program at Wentworth or in an EAC accredited program at another college or university, can be accepted for transfer credit if a grade of “C” (2.00) or better has been received.

Other Policies
In addition to the general requirements for admission and transfer credit listed above, applicants may have to satisfy the following rules: Advanced Placement (AP) Requirements: Applicants for admission or transfer into the BELM program may obtain credit and/or advanced standing based on the achievement of satisfactory scores on designated AP examinations as administered by the College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Program. Advanced Placement is available for Chemistry, Engineering Physics I & II, and Language C or C++ programming.

CLEP Requirements: Subject Examinations of the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) are acceptable for credit in the BELM Program in accordance with Wentworth policy.

Credit for Life Experience: The BELM Program Committee has deemed it unacceptable to accept for academic credit or advanced standing, any work related (life) experience unless it is documented by an appropriate AP examination.

Transfer Credit Restrictions

Maximum Transfer Credit: In any event, no more than 88 credits (50 percent of the 176 credit BELM program) can be granted as transfer credit to any one student.

Senior Design: No transfer credit can be granted for ELMC831 Senior Design I and ELMC881 Senior Design II.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION - ELECTROMECHANICAL ENGINEERING

In addition to the general graduation requirements of the Institute, specific graduation requirements from the Electromechanical Engineering (BELM) program with a Bachelor of Science degree include:

  1. Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 for all technical courses The courses used to determine the cumulative grade point average for all BELM technical courses are shown with a footnote in the curriculum shown below.  If another Wentworth course is substituted for one of these listed courses, the substitute course will be calculated into this cumulative grade point average for all technical courses.
  2. The student must demonstrate proof of taking the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Exam, also known as the Engineer-in-Training (EIT) Exam. Submission to the Registrar of a photocopy of the exam results is required. The FE exam may be taken in the spring semester of the fourth year, or the fall semester of the fifth year.

Electromechanical Engineering3 (BELM)

FRESHMAN YEAR

Fall Semester

R

L

C

CHEM360 Chemistry I 3 2 4
ENGL100 English I 4 0 4
ENGR100 Introduction to Engineering 2 4 4
MATH265 Engineering Mathematics I 3 2 4
Total

12

8

16

Spring Semester

COMP120 Computer Science I Using C 3 2 4
ENGL115 English II 3 0 3
ENGR160 Introduction to Engineering Design 2 4 4
MATH280 Calculus I 4 0 4
PHYS310 Engineering Physics I 3 2 4
Total

15

8

19

SOPHOMORE YEAR

Fall Semester

R

L

C

ELECTIVE Social Science Elective 3 0 3
ELEC231 Network Theory I1 3 2 4
ELECTIVE General Elective2,3 - - 3
MATH290 Calculus II 4 0 4
PHYS320 Engineering Physics II 3 2 4
Total
-

-

18

Spring Semester

R

L

C

ELECTIVE Social Science Elective 3 0 3
ELEC244 Digital Systems1 3 2 4
ELEC281 Network Theory II1 2 2 3
MECH251 Engineering Statics1 3 2 4
ENGL350 Writing Competency Assessment - - 0
MATH510 Calculus III 4 0 4
Total
15

6

18

Note: Prior to entering junior year courses, students must have completed all admission requirements listed above and any additional prerequisites or have received permission from the Program Committee or Department Head to enroll in upper-level courses.

JUNIOR YEAR
Summer Semester     Credits
COOP300 Optional Cooperative Education     0

Fall Semester

R

L

C

ELECTIVE General Elective2,3 - - 3
ELEC443 Analog Circuit Design1 3 2 4
MATH620 Applied Differential Equations I 4 0 4
MECH302 Mechanics of Materials1 3 2 4
MECH505 Engineering Thermodynamics 3 2 4
Total

-

-

19

Spring Semester

R L

C

ELEC471 Embedded Computer Systems1 2 2 3
ELMC461 Electromechanical Design1,3 1 4 3
MATH890 Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory 4 0 4
MECH496 Materials Science1 3 2 4
MECH565 Engineering Fluids1 3 2 4
 
Total
13 10 18

Summer Semester

Credits

COOP400

Cooperative Education I3

0

SENIOR YEAR

Fall Semester

 

R L C
COMM400 Technical Communications 2 2 3
ELEC584 Engineering Signals and Systems1 3 2 4
ELEC586 Motors and Controls1 3 2 4
MATH505 Probability and Statistics for Engineers 3 2 4
MECH595 Engineering Heat Transfer1 3 2 4

Total

14

10 19

Spring Semester

R

L

C

ELEC820 Feedback and Control1 3 2 4
ELECTIVE Humanities or Social Science Elective 4 0 4
MECH572 Engineering Dynamics1 3 2 4
MECH600 Advanced Mechanics of Materials1 3 2 4
MECH620 Engineering Thermal 1 4 3
Total

14

10

19

Summer Semester

Credits

COOP600

Cooperative Education II3

0

FIFTH YEAR
Fall Semester   R L C
ELECTIVE Engineering Elective1, 2,3 - - 3
ELECTIVE Humanities or Social Science Elective 4 0 4
ELMC815 Electromechanical Systems I1 3 2 4
ELMC831 Senior Design I1,3 1 6 4
 
Total
- - 15
Spring Semester        
ELECTIVE Humanities or Social Science Elective 4 0 4
ELMC870 Electromechanical Systems II1 3 2 4
ELMC881 Senior Design II1,3 1 6 4
MGMT510 Engineering Economy 3 0 3
 
Total
11 8 15
      
       R=Class Hours Per Week, L=Lab Hours Per Week, C=Semester Credit Hours

1Courses used to determine the cumulative grade point average (GPA) for Electromechanical Engineering (BELM) technical courses. If another Wentworth course is substituted, the substitute course will be used in the calculation of the technical course GPA. Engineering elective must be approved by the faculty advisor.

2Courses selected with the Faculty Advisor as necessary to complement and to broaden the student's background.

3 Biomedical Systems Engineering Concentration Option
Students enrolled in the Electromechanical Engineering (BELM) program may choose the option of developing a concentration in Biomedical Systems Engineering. The Biomedical Systems Engineering option requirement consists of 6 courses and 2 Cooperative Work Semesters as follows:

The three BMED electives listed below will be taken as the two General Electives and Engineering Elective required in the BELM program:

BMED260 Physiology for Engineers I
BMED460 Physiology for Engineers II
BMED660 Biomedical Systems Engineering

Students in the Biomedical Systems Engineering option will focus on the biomedical area while taking the three required BELM courses and two Cooperative Work Semesters listed below.

ELMC461 Electromechanical Design
ELMC831 Senior Design I
ELMC881 Senior Design II
COOP400 Cooperative Work Semester I
COOP600 Cooperative Work Semester II

Students will work with their faculty advisor to develop a design proposal and cooperative work semester assignment that satisfies the biomedical systems engineering requirement.

Note: The biomedical systems engineering concentration courses will be offered only if there is sufficient student interest and enrollment.


Biomedical Engineering (BBME)

Leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree

Biomedical Engineering is a four-year baccalaureate program providing a solid foundation in physical and life sciences as well as a strong background in multiple engineering disciplines followed by essential courses in biomedical engineering. Two special concentrations will be offered in the program, one on medical devices & systems, and the other on clinical engineering. An integral part of this program is two semesters of cooperative experiential learning at organizations such as hospitals, medical device companies, research centers, regulatory agencies, and start-ups. Graduates of the program will be equipped with the knowledge and skills to meet the challenges in the broad spectrum of biomedical and healthcare industries, while contributing to improving human health. Through a co-op based project-oriented curriculum closely embracing Wentworth's educational philosophy, the program will prepare students to engage in a lifetime of professionalism, learning and service. In addition to having abundant job opportunities growing globally, the graduates will also have the necessary education to pursue advanced studies for professional careers.

The undergraduate curriculum will combine training in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computer science, biology, anatomy, and physiology with rigorous training in essential courses in electrical, mechanical, and biomedical engineering.

Mission and Goals
Wentworth's biomedical engineering program is intended to educate future practicing biomedical engineers at the undergraduate level. Through a practice-oriented education, the graduates will be able to utilize technological advancements, contribute to innovative design solutions in a collaborative environment, and make appropriate decisions for their areas of professional responsibility. Specifically, Wentworth engineering graduates will have gained:

  • expertise in the basics of physical sciences, life sciences, and engineering with applications to solve problems in biology and medicine
  • the skills to be able to design, build, test, report, and assess results for applications to biomedical engineering processes, designs, and projects
  • the ability to use their multidisciplinary background to effectively engage in communication across disciplinary boundaries with the highest professional and ethical standards
  • talent to take leadership roles in the expanding field of biomedical engineering
  • knowledge to initiate self-directed continuous learning opportunities to excel and advance in the field of biomedical engineering
  • an understanding of the challenging needs of their client communities and contribute to providing solutions and improving human health

By the time of graduation from the BBME program, the students will have:

  • mastered fundamental biomedical engineering concepts
  • acquired the ability to understand and solve biomedical engineering problems by integrating and applying basic principles of physical and life sciences, and engineering
  • gained the mathematical background, scientific knowledge, and innovative problem-solving skills necessary to analyze, synthesize, and design biomedical systems
  • developed the capability to evaluate and respond to the impact of a continually changing technology and the need for critical decision making— both personally and professionally
  • obtained proficiency in both oral and written communication skills, an ability to function effectively within multi-disciplinary teams
  • developed appreciation of the importance of the liberal arts for a rich and fulfilled life
  • received a broad education that enables an understanding of how professional, ethical, and social responsibilities impact the practice of biomedical engineering
  • gained the ability to engage in continuous learning of contemporary issues and challenges facing biomedical engineers and to seek solution approaches
  • acquired analytical reasoning and creative insight into issues that are technological and social, and incorporate professional standards and ethics into their engineering projects

Biomedical Engineering

FRESHMAN YEAR

Fall Semester

R

L

C

  Calculus I 4 0 4
  Engineering Physics I 3 2 4
  Biology I 3 2 4
  Intro to Biomedical Engineering 1 2 2
  English I 4 0 4
Total

15

6

18

Spring Semester

  Calculus II 4 0 4
  Engineering Physics II 3 2 4
  Biology II 3 2 4
  Intro to Engineering Design 2 4 4
  English II 3 0 3
Total

15

8

19

SOPHOMORE YEAR

Fall Semester

R

L

C

  Calculus III 4 0 4
  Electric Circuit Analysis & Design 3 2 4
  Engineering Computation 3 2 4
  Anatomy & Physiology 3 2 4
  Technical Communications 2 2 3
Total
15

8

19

Spring Semester

R

L

C

  Linear Algebra 4 0 4
  Chemistry I (general) 3 2 4
  Analog & Digital Electronics 3 2 4
  Biomedical Electronics & Instrumentation 3 2 4
  Social Science Elective (100 level) 3 0 3
  Writing Competency Assessment - - 0
Total
16

8

19

(Students select concentration track in this semester)

Summer Semester

Credits

Pre-Cooperative Work Semester (Optional)

0

Note: Prior to entering junior year courses, students must have completed all admission requirements listed above and additional prerequisites or have received permission from the department to enroll in upper-level courses.
JUNIOR YEAR

Fall Semester

R

L

C

  Chemistry II (organic and bio) 3 2 4
  Microprocessors & Embedded Systems 3 2 4
  Engineering Mechanics 3 2 4
  Biostatistics 3 2 4
  Social Science Elective (100 Level) 3 0 3
Total

15

8

19

Spring Semester

   

Credits

Cooperative Work Semester I

0

Summer Semester

R L C
  Engineering Thermodynamics 3 0 3
  Data Communications & Networks 3 2 4
  Biomechanics 3 2 4
  Engineering Elective I1 3 2 4
  Humanities / Social Science Elective (385 level or above) 4 0 4
 
Total
16 6 19
SENIOR YEAR

Fall Semester

 

    Credits
  Cooperative Work Semester II    

Spring Semester

R

L

C

  Biomaterials/Tissue Engineering 3 2 4
  Senior Design I 1 4 3
  Engineering Elective II1 3 2 4
  Management Elective 4 0 4
  Humanities / Social Science Elective (385 level or above) 4 0 4
Total

15

8

19

Summer Semester

Credits

  Engineering in Biomedicine 1 0 1
  Senior Design II 1 4 3
  Engineering Elective III Special Topics1 3 2 4
  Biomedical Ethics & Regulatory Affairs 2 0 2
  Humanities / Social Science Elective (385 level or above) 4 0 4

Total

11

6

14

      
       R=Class Hours Per Week, L=Lab Hours Per Week, C=Semester Credit Hours

1A total of 12 semester credit hours of engineering electives must be taken as a part of the concentration track in this program. Students may choose, after consultation with their faculty advisor, among the technical electives offered by the department each semester. Engineering elective courses will include medical devices and systems, biomedical optics & imaging, clinical engineering practice, medical information & telemedicine, design & accreditation of hospitals, and computers in biomedicine.

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